The content of this website has not yet been adapted to the decisions of the National Security Council of 23 September 2020. We are working on an update. Thank you for your understanding.
fps health belgium banner

What are the current measures?

Current measures

The government has set rules to stop the spread of coronavirus. Follow these rules. This way, you will avoid becoming ill or making others ill. Thank you for following them. Together we’ll stop the coronavirus.

Please note: some cities and municipalities will also have extra rules in place. Check the website of your city or municipality. How is these level determined? More information here

Journeys

In Belgium

  • You are allowed to move around freely.
  • If you are using public transport (bus, tram or train) and are you older than 12 years of age, wear a face mask or a scarf covering your mouth and nose.

On holiday abroad

Do you have a question about journeys ?

Work

Do you have a question about employment?

Shops and catering industry

  • All shops are open. You can go shopping in groups of maximum 2 people.
  • Night shops are open until 10:00 p.m.
  • Markets are open.
  • You must wear a face mask. This is mandatory.
  • Do you own a shop? Read the guide by the FPS Economy with tips to open your shop safely. This guide also contains information for market vendors, hairdressers, beauticians and shopping centres.
  • Pubs and restaurants are open until 1:00 a.m.
    • It is best to make a reservation.
    • You can go to bars or restaurants only with your family (or the people you live with) and your 5 stable contacts.
    • Stay seated at the table.
    • You must wear a face mask. This is mandatory. If you are sitting down at a table, you do not need to wear a face mask.
    • You must leave your contact details.
  • Do you own a pub or restaurant? Read the guide by the FPS Economy with tips to open your pub or restaurant safely.

Do you have a question about employment?

Social contact

  • Each family (or anyone living together with others) may meet up with a maximum of 5 people. These must always be the same people. It is not necessary to keep a distance of 1.5 meters.
  • If you can respect the distance of 1.5 meters, then you can do activities with a maximum of 10 people, for example walking or cycling.

Do you have a question about social contact ?

Sports and leisure

  • All locations have reopened, e.g. libraries, theme parks, indoor playgrounds and casinos.
  • For official events, such as village fetes, sports competitions or cultural exhibitions, there will be a maximum number of people allowed to attend.
    • a maximum of 200 people inside and 400 people outside.
    • Each organisation has specific rules. Check the website
  • Camps for children may go ahead.
  • You must wear a face mask (from the age of 12). This is mandatory in the following places:
    • shops and shopping malls,
    • shopping streets,
    • crowded places,
    • public buildings,
    • markets,
    • public transport,
    • libraries,
    • cinemas,
    • museums,
    • theatres, concert halls and conference halls,
    • auditoria,
    • fairgrounds
    • religious buildings
  • You need to give your contact info when you go to:
    • wellness centres
    • sports lessons in a club
    • swimming pools
    • casinos
    • party and reception rooms

What is not yet allowed?

  • Discotheques or night clubs are not yet allowed to reopen.
  • Big events (such as festivals) are not allowed.

Sport

  • If you are part of a sports club you are allowed to exercise together with a maximum of 50 people.
  • You can exercise in a fitness club, sports club or swimming pool.
  • You can visit a sauna or wellness centre. Publicly accessible jacuzzis, hammams and steam rooms remain closed.

Religion

  • Worship services are allowed.
    • A maximum of 200 people may attend.
    • Physical contact is not allowed.
    • You must wear a face mask (from the age of 12 years). This is mandatory

Do you have a question about sports or culture?

Nurseries and schools

  • Nurseries are open. Your nursery will contact you with more information.
  • Your school will give you more information about the academic year.

Do you have a question about nurseries or schools?

Frequently asked questions

Go to results Examples: masks school fever train airport
These questions and answers are not yet adapted to the decisions of the National Security Council of 23 September 2020. We are working on an update. Thank you for your understanding.

Results

General measures

  • measures government federal flanders brussels german social contact four persons bubble group boyfriend girlfriend partner parents grandparents
  • What can I do myself?

    The National Security Council of 23 September has decided to gradually move towards risk management based on the six golden rules. As a reminder, the six golden rules are as follows:

    Some activities are prohibited as they either involve too close contact between people or mass gatherings. It should be noted, once again, that wearing a face mask is an additional protection that does not exempt people from applying the six golden rules for individual behaviour, i.e.:

    1. Hygiene measures remain essential;
    2. Outdoor activities should be prioritised wherever possible. Where necessary, rooms must be adequately ventilated;
    3. Additional precautions must be taken for people belonging to a high-risk group. With this in mind, a charter has been drawn up to help elderly people find their place in society in complete safety. You can consult it at the following address (Dutch only): https://d34j62pglfm3rr.cloudfront.net/downloads/Chartre_Senior_NL.pdf
    4. Social distancing of 1.5 meters continues to apply, except for people within the same household or between people who have close contact on a regular basis, for children up to 12 years of age and for people with whom there is closer contact. People who cannot respect social distancing must wear a face mask;
    5. It is necessary for everyone to limit their close contacts as much as possible. “Closer contact” implies contact which lasts longer than 15 minutes, without respecting social distancing and without wearing a face mask. During this phase of the epidemic, it is recommended that each person limits themselves to close contact with no more than 5 different people (outside the household) per month.
    6. Gatherings are limited to a maximum of 10 people (excluding children under 12 years of age).

    These six golden rules are instructions and not recommendations. They must therefore be adhered to by everyone.

  • Is there a regulatory framework for organising activities or opening a business?

    These six golden rules are instructions and not recommendations. They must therefore be adhered to by everyone.

    • Organised activities can take place, with protocols or the application of the general rules provided to protect both users and staff. These protocols are being drawn up in consultation with the competent ministers;
    • The protocols are evaluated on a regular basis. If there is no protocol for a sector, the general rules provided for in the prevailing ministerial order apply. To the extent possible, links to the available protocols will be published on the website www.info-coronavirus.be/nl/protocollen;
    • Teleworking is strongly recommended where possible.
  • What does the declaration of a federal phase mean for the local authorities?

    A federal phase means that the Governors and Mayors must apply the general measures and must repeal their previous orders after the publication of the Ministerial Order. The aim is to harmonise the measures throughout Belgian territory. Nevertheless, and following the resurgence occurring in parts of our country, the Ministerial Order has been amended to allow governors and mayors to take additional measures imposed by the health situation, subject to the following conditions:

    1. If a mayor decides to take preventive measures, they will do so in consultation with the governor and the competent authorities of the federated entities.
    2. If the mayor or the governor is informed by the health authority of the federated entity concerned of a local resurgence of the epidemic within their territory, or if they identify this themselves:

    • They must take the additional measures required by the situation; • They must immediately inform the governor and the competent authorities of the federated entities; • If the planned measures have an impact on federal resources or on neighbouring municipalities or at national level, consultation is required in accordance with the structures provided for in the Royal Decree of 22 May 2019 on local emergency planning.

    The mayor is responsible for oral and visual communication of the specific measures taken on the territory of their municipality. The local government shall ensure correct communication for both residents and visitors. It is therefore recommended that citizens consult the communication channels of the municipality in which they live (or intend to visit) in order to find out about any specific measures that may apply. The Minister of the Interior shall provide instructions regarding coordination.

  • What are the consequences of non-compliance with the measures decided at the federal level?
    Compliance with the announced measures is essential in order to avoid the uncontrolled growth of the pandemic and additional reinforcement of the measures. We are counting on everyone’s sense of civic duty and responsibility. In the event of non-compliance with the measures (provided by the Ministerial Order), sanctions are possible under Article 187 of the law on Civil Security of 15 May 2007, among others. Local authorities remain competent for public order in accordance with article 135 §2 of the new municipal law, without prejudice to the measures or the spirit of the measures taken at a higher level. The police forces will carry out permanent checks to ensure strict compliance with the measures.
  • If the chosen social bubble contains grandparents, may they look after the grandchildren?
    Yes, if they are part of the social bubble. However, if they are part of a high-risk group (65+, poor health, etc.) this is strongly discouraged.
  • Why am I required to give my phone number when arriving at a catering establishment, sports class, swimming pool, etc.?
    In the event that a person tests positive, these records make it easier to trace people who may have been in contact with the person in question. As a result, these people can be tested quickly and, if need be, isolated. The contact details of one visitor or participant per household must be recorded on arrival. The visitor or participant must give their express consent, visitors or participants who refuse to do so will be refused access to the establishment on arrival. The data may be limited to a telephone number or an e-mail address.
  • Is the government using my personal telecoms data in the fight against the coronavirus?
    No, the government only has access to anonymous data, and carries out analyses that help in the fight against the coronavirus on the basis of this data. The government does not process any address, telephone number or name. It is ensured that the data cannot in any way be traced back to an individual. At the level of aggregation used, members of the public are completely anonymous and their identity is protected.
  • Why are telecoms data used?
    The government uses the anonymised and aggregated telecoms data to help make decisions regarding the control of the epidemic. Using this data, the government can ascertain various useful elements, such as: has the mobility of Belgians decreased since the measures were adopted by the National Security Council? In which geographical areas is mobility higher than in others?
  • Does this mean that all my movements are now being monitored?
    No, no new data is being collected in the context of these analyses. The data does not leave the premises of the telecoms operators. They are anonymised (i.e., it is not possible to know which individual is behind which data point) and aggregated (i.e., there is no analysis of a single individual’s behaviour).
  • Will my data be stored or reused?
    No, the data processed in the context of this project are only being used to tackle the Covid-19 epidemic. Irrelevant data is immediately and continuously deleted. Once the corona crisis is over, all data will be deleted so that they can never be stolen or used against members of the public.
  • Why is it relevant to use telecoms data in the context of a Covid-19 epidemic?
    Using mobile phone data (aggregated and anonymised) to manage epidemiological crises has already been done and has proven its effectiveness. For example, technologies similar to those currently being used were implemented during the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2013-2015. The Covid-19 virus is transmitted due to physical proximity between individuals. As such, the use of data regarding population movements can provide health authorities with essential information for managing the epidemic.
  • Can this data be used against me?
    Absolutely not. The data processed are completely anonymous and cannot be traced back to individuals. Analyses are only carried out to inform policymakers and the public. Under no circumstances will the data be used for repressive or punitive ends against individual members of the public.
  • Are there similar initiatives in other European countries?
    Yes, governments and mobile operators in other European countries, as well as the European Commission, are working on similar initiatives. The Belgian government is in contact with some of these countries to share expertise and, to the extent possible, also measure cross-border movements.
  • Do these practices comply with national and European privacy regulations?
    Absolutely. In Belgium, special attention is given to scrupulously respecting privacy regulations, unlike in some other regions of the world. The government’s approach is “privacy first”. Not only is compliance with applicable legislation continually monitored, data privacy experts and an ethics committee are also involved in analysing the data. The approach and working methods have been approved by the Data Protection Authority.
  • Who analyses and uses the data?
    The government decides which analyses will be applied to the anonymised and aggregated data, and for which purposes these analyses can be used. This is in close consultation with the Data Protection Authority. The telecoms operators only supply anonymised and aggregated data to Sciensano, which then sends the requested analyses to the government.
  • Can I choose not to provide location data in the context of the 'data against Corona' project?
    No, your location data are not supplied individually. The government only receives an overview of anonymised and aggregated data. This is never individually traceable and completely anonymous. This supply of data has been coordinated with the Data Protection Authority.

Work & economy

  • food bank bar lawyer volonteer café carwash hairdresser work employee employer workplace shops construction finance foodtruck independent tourism working from home shift company online shopping internship intern chip shop restaurant control garage finance
  • What are the general principles for the economy?

    A balance was sought between maintaining physical and mental health and restarting the economy. During this new phase of scaling back the lockdown measures, all economic activities may be resumed, with the exception of those which still pose too large a risk to public health. Teleworking is still strongly recommended if possible. Remote transactions and meetings should be given preference where possible. For activities which have resumed, the protocols established and approved by the competent authorities must be respected. The protocols are being drawn up in consultation between the representatives of the sectors and the competent ministers (including the ministers of the federated entities if the matters fall within their competence. The protocols applicable to the various sectors may be re-evaluated and, if possible, made more flexible from 1 July 2020 if circumstances allow. This will have to be in agreement with the competent authority for each protocol. Conversely, certain conditions may become stricter if the epidemic develops unfavourably. To the extent possible, links to the available protocols will be published on the website www.info-coronavirus.be.

    If there is no protocol for a sector, the eight general minimal rules provided for in the ministerial order apply;

    • The company or association must inform its customers and employees in good time regarding the preventive measures in force and provide the employees with appropriate training.
    • A distance of 1.5 meters between each person must be ensured;
    • Face masks and other personal protective equipment are always strongly recommended within businesses and associations and must be used in these places if the rules of social distancing cannot be complied with, due to the nature of the activity performed;
    • The activity must be organised in such a way as to avoid gatherings;
    • The company or association must provide staff and customers with the means to ensure the necessary hand hygiene;
    • The company or association must take the appropriate hygiene measures to regularly disinfect the workplace and the material used;
    • The company or association must ensure good ventilation of the workplace;
    • A contact person must be designated and announced so that customers and staff can report a possible COVID-19 coronavirus infection, in order to facilitate contact tracing.
  • Which shops can stay open?

    All companies and associations must take the necessary measures to protect everyone against the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, including the application of the social distancing rules, in particular maintaining a distance of 1.5 metres between each person. As a company, they must follow the provisions laid down in the applicable generic guides to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace, which are available on the website of the FPS Economy and FPS Employment.

    All businesses and associations selling goods or services to consumers may open to the public, with the exception of:

    • night clubs and dance halls (reopening 1 September 2020 at the earliest);
    • jacuzzis, steam rooms and hammams, unless their use is private.

    Tips for the reopening of businesses: https://economie.fgov.be/nl/publicaties/coronavirus-gids-voor-de

  • What are the specific measures for shops that remain open?

    These companies may resume their activities in accordance with the minimum general rules set out in the three guides, possibly supplemented by rules laid down in the sectoral protocol applicable to them and published on the website of the public service responsible for them. If there is no protocol, they must follow the general rules of the Ministerial Order, which are listed above. As regards shops or businesses that work by appointment, these can admit customers for as long as they usually do and without limitation of the number of persons;

    Companies can follow the instructions set out in the ‘Generic guide for combatting the spread of COVID-19 at work’. Employers must inform workers in good time regarding the prevention measures in force and provide appropriate training.

    A number of specific conditions apply to shopping centres:

    • One client per 10m²;
    • Means to ensure necessary hand hygiene must be made available at the entrance and exit;
    • Markers to indicate 1.5 metres distance must be applied to the floor and/or with signs.
    • A maximum of two people can shop together. Social distancing rules must be respected, unless they are part of the same social bubble or live under the same roof. It is the retailer’s decision whether they allow for 2 people to shop together or not. One or two adults can accompany minors living under the same roof or a person in need of an escort.

    The rules imposed on shops also apply to shops located in a shopping centre, in particular the time limit on shopping (30min).

    Wearing a face mask

    Everyone from the age of 12 (customers, staff, etc.) is obliged to wear a face mask or any other fabric alternative in shopping streets, shops and shopping centres, and any private or public place with significant footfall. If this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn.

    Mayors are responsible for determining the shopping streets and the frequently visited private and public spaces in their municipality. These spaces will be clearly defined by a notice specifying the times during which the obligation applies.

    Shops are defined as establishments open to the public which are engaged in retail and/or customer service activities, such as supermarkets, grocery stores, butchers, bakeries, sandwich shops, garages, pharmacies, laundries, banks, insurance offices and bookshops. In shopping centres and shopping streets face masks may only be removed for the time strictly necessary for the consumption of food and drink. If consumption takes place in a catering establishment, the catering rules (described below) apply. In areas of shops and shopping centres that are not open to the public, it is not compulsory to wear a face mask under the following two conditions: the areas are completely separate from the areas that are open to the public and it does not contravene any guide or protocol that may be in force.

  • What rules are there for customers?
    Several restrictions also apply to customers:
    A maximum of two people can shop together. Social distancing rules must be respected, unless they are part of the same social bubble or live under the same roof. It is the retailer’s decision whether they allow for 2 people to shop together or not. One or two adults can accompany minors living under the same roof or a person in need of an escort.
  • What about trade fairs (including exhibitions)?

    From 1 September 2020, the organisers of trade fairs, including exhibitions, may carry out their activities in accordance with the Protocol laid down by the competent Minister in consultation with the sector.

    The following conditions apply for organising trade fairs:

    • The necessary crowd-control measures are taken, both inside and outside buildings, including car parks;
    • An online or telephone ticketing system must be implemented;
    • No more than one visitor per 10m².

    Trade fair visitors from the age of 12 must wear a face mask or a fabric alternative.

  • Who is responsible for monitoring compliance in shops?
    It is the responsibility of the shop owner to enforce the rules on social distancing and wearing face masks. The owner must take the appropriate measures to ensure compliance. If they rely on a security firm, this must be in accordance with the law of 2 October 2017 regulating private and special security.
  • Are there any restrictions on opening hours for shops?
    Shops can remain open during their normal opening hours and days.
  • Are there any specific restrictions for night shops?
    Night shops are defined as: any establishment whose net sales area does not exceed 150 m², which does not carry out any activities other than the sale of general food and household goods and which has an obvious and permanent “Night shop” sign. Night shops may be open between their usual opening hours and 10.00pm. Petrol stations with in-house shops are not considered as night shops and therefore do not have to close at 10.00pm.
  • Are there any specific restrictions with regard to opening hours for casinos and amusement arcades?
    Yes, they may carry out their activities from the usual opening hours until one 1am, unless the municipal authorities require them to close earlier. They must remain closed from 1am for a continuous period of five consecutive hours.
  • Can I use jacuzzis, steam rooms and hammams?
    The use at your home is permitted. Wellness centres are allowed to rent jacuzzis, steam rooms and hammams privately, on reservation and only for people belonging to the same household or belonging to the “closer contacts”. In addition, they must be thoroughly cleaned after each use, as specified in the applicable protocol. Any other shared use of these facilities not stipulated in the above-mentioned provisions is not permitted.
  • Are changes of crew for seafarers subject to the same regime as those for essential services?
    Yes, the same rules apply.
  • How should I clean and disinfect my retail space?

    No specific measures are necessary for disinfecting the area. It is enough to thoroughly clean the office/area where the person works and common areas such as kitchen and toilets, with the usual detergents. General hand hygiene must continue to be encouraged among staff.

    Any common cleaning agent can be used to clean work surfaces, floors, walls, etc. The user instructions must be followed rigorously and always ensure to rinse thoroughly with potable water. Only authorised biocides may be used to disinfect the rooms in your company. The conditions of use on the label and stipulated in the authorisation document must be strictly adhered to. For example, it may be necessary to protect or remove foodstuffs from the treated area or to thoroughly rinse the treated surfaces with potable water. It is prohibited to spray biocides onto fruit and vegetables with a view to ‘disinfect’ them. Biocides can be harmful to human health. You can consult the list of authorised biocides and their specific conditions of use via the following link: https://www.health.belgium.be/en/list-authorised-biocides-and-annual-report.

  • Can a company, affected by the COVID-19 measures, carry out activities other than those declared in the Crossroads Bank for Enterprises?
    Yes, a company can temporarily carry out its activities in a different way without any administrative steps relative to the CBE and without costs. This applies, for example, to a caterer wishing to function as a restaurant or to a nightclub wishing to function as a bar. These new activities must, of course, be carried out in accordance with the rules of the Protocol which will apply as a result.
  • What about the catering sector (horeca)?

    From the age of 12, every customer of a catering establishment is obliged to cover their mouth and nose with a face mask or any alternative in fabric, except when sitting at their own table. When it is not possible to wear a face mask or any fabric alternative due to medical reasons, a face shield can be worn.

    Catering establishments may receive customers, subject to compliance with the protocol which includes at least the following conditions:

    • the tables must be positioned in such a way that a distance of at least 1.5 meters between the tables is guaranteed, unless the tables are separated by a plexiglass wall or an equivalent alternative with a minimum height of 1.8 meters;
    • as long as the social bubble is respected, a maximum of ten people per table is allowed (not including children younger than 12). It is the individual responsibility of the customer to respect the social bubble;
    • only seats at tables are allowed;
    • each customer must remain at their own table;
    • wearing a face mask is mandatory for staff in the premises (if this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn);
    • wearing a face mask is mandatory for kitchen staff (if this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn);
    • no service is allowed at the bar, with the exception of sole traders, and subject to a distance of 1.5 meters;
    • terraces and public spaces must be organised in accordance with the rules laid down by the municipal authorities and in compliance with the same rules as those that apply indoors;
    • bars and restaurants may remain open between their usual opening hours and 1 am, unless the municipal authorities require them to close earlier. In addition, they must remain closed during 5 consecutive hours. These restrictions do not apply to takeaways and meal deliveries;
    • The contact details of one customer per table, which may be limited to a telephone number or an email address, must be recorded on arrival and kept for 14 calendar days, to facilitate any subsequent contact tracing. These contact details may only be used for the purposes of tackling COVID-19, they must be destroyed after 14 calendar days and customers must give their express consent. Customers who refuse to complete their details will be refused entry to the establishment. In addition, the individual and collective use of hookahs is prohibited in places accessible to the public.

    A guide has been drawn up for the catering (horeca) industry describing the protocol for the sector (Dutch only) (https://economie.fgov.be/nl/publicaties/gids-voor-een-veilige).

    On the other hand, night clubs and dance halls will remain closed.

  • Is my local market and other itinerant activitiets open?

    Markets (including antique or flea markets) and fairs may take place, subject to prior consent of the local authorities. The necessary measures must be taken at all markets and fairs permitted by the local authorities to protect everyone from the spread of the coronavirus, including the application of the social distancing rules, in particular maintaining a distance of 1.5 metres between each person. Where the local authorities do permit a market, they will establish the conditions for this. Appropriate and timely preventative measures will be taken, as recommended in the “General guide for re-opening shops to combat the spread of COVID-19”, which is available on the FPS Economy’s website.

    Each market and fair must comply with the following conditions:

    • The conditions determined by the local authorities:
    • The social distancing rules are being respected.
    • The maximum number of visitors permitted at a market (excluding fairs) is one per 1.5 running metres at the stall.
    • The maximum number of visitors admitted to a fair or market is 200. As from 1 September 2020, this number will be increased to 400.
    • Market vendors and fairground vendors are required to cover their mouth and nose with a mask or any other fabric alternative (if this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn);
    • Customers are required to wear a face mask when the local authorities impose it or in all situations where it is impossible to ensure compliance with the rules of social distancing.
    • Means for guaranteeing the necessary hand hygiene must be made available at the entrance and exit of the market or fair by the competent municipal authorities. Market vendors and funfair vendors must also make hand gels available;
    • Food and drink may be consumed on the spot at the stall or food truck, under the same conditions which apply for the catering industry. Takeaways continue to be permitted. For example, eating an ice-cream or a hamburger at the market/fair is perfectly allowed;
    • An organisation or system will be introduced to check how many customers are present at the market or fair;
    • A one-way traffic plan will be drawn up, with separate entrances and exits for the market or fair, unless a justified deviation from this is permitted by the local authorities in exceptional circumstances that provides for an alternative solution.
    • A maximum of two people can shop together. Social distancing rules must be respected, unless they are part of the same social bubble or live under the same roof. It is the competent municipal authority’s decision whether they allow for 2 people to shop together or not. One or two adults can accompany minors living under the same roof or a person in need of an escort.

    Fairs are not permitted to remain open between 1 am and 6 am.

  • What is a "fair"?
    A “fair” is considered to be a gathering of travelling fairground vendors; it includes attractions and rides as well as several stalls.
  • What about infection through packaging and food?
    The website of the FASFC contains information to clarify matters for consumers and operators in the food chain (Dutch or French only). http://www.favv-afsca.fgov.be/professionelen/publicaties/mededelingen/coronavirus.asp
  • What are the general principles for companies?

    It must be ensured that the continuity of the Belgian economy is not jeopardised. In this context, every link in the chain must be guaranteed, from raw materials to production and consumption, including imports and exports.

    The general principles are as follows:

    For companies that do not belong to the crucial sectors and essential services:

    • Teleworking is strongly encouraged in all companies for all staff whose position is suitable for it.

    • Where teleworking cannot be applied, companies must take the appropriate measures:

      • ensuring maximum compliance with the social distancing rules, and in particular that a distance of 1.5m is maintained between each person;
      • if the social distancing rules cannot be guaranteed, ensuring at least an equivalent level of protection.
      • If work is performed in shifts and teams:
        • Limit the size of the teams;
        • Limit rotations in the composition of the teams.

    When transport is organised by a company, passengers are required to cover their mouth and nose with a mask or any other fabric alternative and, where possible, maintain a distance of 1.5m between each person. If it is not possible to wear a face mask for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn.

    The application of these principles must be guaranteed at company level and developed by taking preventative measures as defined in the “Generic guide for combatting the spread of COVID-19 at work” (available at: https://employment.belgium.be/sites/default/files/content/documents/Coronavirus/Genericguide.pdf); possibly supplemented by:

    • guidelines at sectoral level;
    • and/or guidelines at company level; and/or other appropriate measures offering at least an equivalent level of protection. Collective measures always take precedence over individual measures.

    For companies that do belong to the crucial sectors and essential services:

    • Teleworking is strongly encouraged in all companies for all staff whose position is suitable for it. As a result of the reduction in the number of infections and in order to allow social contact and personal interaction between workers, it is now possible for workers to work e.g. 1 to 2 days a week at their place of work, provided that the necessary measures are taken to avoid infections at work. This good practice can be built up gradually, and can then continue until the end of the summer.

    • In addition, these companies and services are obliged to apply, to the extent possible, the social distancing rules. Sectors and employers belonging to crucial sectors and essential services who have not interrupted their activities and who have already taken the necessary safety measures themselves can use the generic guide above as a source of inspiration.

    As regards subcontracting and ancillary services of crucial sectors and essential services, they are subject to the regulations applicable to the crucial sectors and essential services.

  • Which companies are required to keep customer data for the purpose of contact tracing and under what conditions?

    The contact details of one visitor or participant per household must be recorded on arrival at the following places:

    • wellness centres;
    • group sport classes;
    • swimming pools;
    • casinos and amusement arcades;
    • party and reception venues; The visitor or participant must give their express consent, visitors or participants who refuse to do so will be refused access to the establishment on arrival. The details may be limited to a telephone number or an e-mail address and must be kept for 14 calendar days to facilitate any subsequent contact tracing. These contact details may only be used for the purposes of tackling COVID-19. After 14 calendar days the details must be destroyed.
  • What are the additional obligations for employers and users who temporarily employ foreign employees or self-employed persons?

    The Ministerial Order provides that employers in the construction, cleaning, agriculture, horticulture and meat sectors, who temporarily employ an employee or self-employed person living or residing abroad, keep an up-to-date register.

    This register should be kept from when the activity starts until fourteen days after the activity has ended and must contain the following information about the employee or self-employed person:

    • identification data;
    • place of residence in Belgium;
    • telephone number;
    • the details of the person with whom he/she works.

    These contact details may only be used for the purposes of tackling COVID-19. They must be destroyed 14 days after the activity has concluded. The obligation to register does not apply to:

    • Frontier workers;
    • When the employee/self-employed person does not stay longer than 48 hours.

    If the employees and self-employed persons are required to complete the Passenger Locator Form (See question: “When should I fill in a Passenger Locator Form?” in the ‘International’ section), the employer must check whether they have done this. In the absence of proof that the form has been filled in, the employer must ensure that the form is completed at the latest when the activity starts. For more information, please consult Article 2bis of the Ministerial Order amending the Ministerial Order of 30 June 2020 laying down urgent measures to limit the spread of COVID-19.

Health

  • sick infected food health help suicide psychological social numbers deaths press conference steven van gucht sciensano health care mouth mask face mask contact tracing tracking fabric pets dog cat vet doctor nurse hospital care taker healthcare provider epidemic pandemic fear angry depression spiritually mentally healthy youth child abuse violence mourning death afraid testing symptoms support help cough diarrhea cold sore throat abdominal pain fever shortness of breath psychologist dermatologist residential care centres heart lungs intensive care unit hospital retirement home serviceflat infection FFP2 FFP3 pharmacy pharmacist diagnose infection packaging podiatrist
  • What are the general measures applicable to the health sector?
    Care for people remains a priority and must be guaranteed. In recent months, the pandemic has had a significant impact on healthcare provision, both in primary care and in hospitals. Caregivers and hospitals are making every effort to continue providing the best care to people infected with COVID-19 while safely organising access to general and specialised healthcare. The aim is to ensure that everyone has ‘standard’ access to healthcare and that the medical infrastructure needed to care for people suffering from the virus is not overloaded. It is advisable to inquire at the care facilities and follow their guidelines. Both the care providers active in ambulatory care and the care providers in the hospitals have resumed their activities for both urgent and non-urgent care. Blood collections must continue, with respect for social distancing measures as much as possible. Persons who are ill must, as always, be excluded.
  • Are visitors allowed in hospitals?
    Hospitals must organise individual arrangements for visitors that ensure the safety of patients, staff and visitors. Therapeutic leave for children and adolescents under the age of 18 is authorised for all hospitals, with the hospital providing an arrangement that ensures the safety of other patients and staff. For psychiatric hospitals, the arrangements for visitors from 11 May 2020 remain in force. It is specified that the terms for family visits apply to all patients. Patients and visitors are advised to contact their hospital to find out what the exact terms of a visit are.
  • Is there a risk of infection through contact with objects and surfaces?
    This risk exists, but is much smaller than through direct contact with an infected person. In ideal conditions, the virus survives on average around three hours on smooth surfaces and materials (such as door handles, handrails and tables). On absorbent material (such as cardboard, paper and textiles), the virus cannot easily survive. The virus is highly sensitive to dehydration, heat and sunlight. Anyone who ingests virus droplets via contact with hands in their mouth, nose or eyes can become infected with the virus. It is important to wash hands regularly and thoroughly after contact with surfaces and packaging that have been touched by many people. As regards contamination via packaging materials and foodstuffs, more information is available on the site of the FASFC: http://www.favv.be/professionelen/publicaties/mededelingen/coronavirus.asp
  • What are the recommendations for wearing face masks and gloves in public places?

    Anyone aged 12 and over is obliged to cover their mouth and nose with a face mask or any other fabric alternative in all situations where it is impossible to ensure compliance with the rules of social distancing. This obligation does not apply to:

    • people living under the same roof
    • children mixing up to the age of 12
    • people meeting each other as part of the “closer contact” rule
    • counsellors and their clients (people in need of counselling).

    In addition, wearing a face mask is compulsory in a number of places, regardless of the number of people present there:

    • on public transport from entering the airport, the station, on the platform or a bus, (pre-)metro, tram, train stop or any other means of transport organised by a public authority. Public transport drivers are not required to cover their nose and mouth, insofar as the driver is well-isolated in a cabin on the one hand, and a poster and/or sticker indicates to users the reason why the driver is not wearing a mask on the other;
    • At trade fairs including exhibitions;
    • for close-contact professions and their customers. The customer’s mask may only be removed by the customer for a specific facial treatment and only for the time strictly necessary for this treatment.
    • for hotel and catering staff;
    • for kitchen staff in the catering sector;
    • for customers in catering establishments, except when they are sitting at their own table;
    • In shops and shopping centres;
    • In shopping streets, at markets, including bric-a-brac and flea markets, at funfairs and in any private or public are with significant footfall, which is determined by the competent local authority and demarcated by a notice specifying the times at which the obligation applies.
    • In cinemas, theatres, concert halls and conference rooms, auditoriums, places of worship & reflection, museums and libraries;
    • In casinos and amusement arcades;

    When it is not possible to wear a face mask or any fabric alternative due to medical reasons, a face shield can be worn.

    People who are unable to wear a face mask, a fabric alternative or a face shield due to a disability, substantiated by a medical certificate, do not have to comply with this obligation.

    It should be noted, once again, that wearing a face mask is an additional protection that does not exempt people from applying the six golden rules for individual behaviour, i.e.:

    1. Hygiene measures remain essential;
    2. Outdoor activities should be prioritised wherever possible. Where necessary, rooms must be adequately ventilated;
    3. Additional precautions must be taken for people belonging to a high-risk group. With this in mind, a charter has been drawn up to help elderly people find their place in society in complete safety. You can consult it at the following address (Dutch only): https://d34j62pglfm3rr.cloudfront.net/downloads/Chartre_Senior_NL.pdf
    4. Social distancing of 1.5 meters continues to apply, except for people within the same household or between people who have close contact on a regular basis, for children up to 12 years of age and for people with whom there is closer contact. People who cannot respect social distancing must wear a face mask;
    5. It is necessary for everyone to limit their close contacts as much as possible. “Closer contact” implies contact which lasts longer than 15 minutes, without respecting social distancing and without wearing a face mask. During this phase of the epidemic, it is recommended that each person limits themselves to close contact with no more than 5 different people (outside the household) per month.
    6. Gatherings are limited to a maximum of 10 people (excluding children under 12 years of age). These six golden rules are instructions and not recommendations. They must therefore be adhered to by everyone.

    For more information about fabric face masks, please visit:
    https://www.info-coronavirus.be/nl/mondmasker/

    However, wearing gloves is not recommended, as it gives a false sense of security, people still touch their nose, mouth and eyes if they are wearing gloves, whereby they can still get infected. It is much better to regularly wash hands with soap and water.

  • Is it allowed to take off your face mask temporarily in a public place where it is mandatory to wear a face mask?
    Yes, the face mask may be removed temporarily, but only for the time strictly necessary for the consumption of food or beverages (e.g. ice cream, waffle, hamburger).
  • Are there special arrangements for wearing masks for people who are deaf or hard of hearing?
    Yes, in such cases, the interlocutor of a deaf or hard of hearing person can temporarily remove their mask so that the person can lip read. This is only possible for the time strictly necessary for the conversation, subject to social distancing.
  • Who is currently being tested?

    Detailed information concerning the procedure for general practitioners can be found on the Sciensano website: https://epidemio.wiv-isp.be/ID/Pages/2019-nCoV_procedures.aspx.

    More information: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/testing/

  • Which quarantine measures have been relaxed?

    Quarantine has been shortened and the procedure simplified.

    • When developing symptoms, the patient should self-isolate immediately for 7 days and contact a doctor to arrange for a test. If the patient tests positive, he/she should remain in quarantine. If the patient tests negative, he/she may end quarantine after the clinical resolution of symptoms.

    • Asymptomatic individuals who have had close contact with a person who has tested positive should immediately quarantine for 7 days as soon as they become aware of this or are contacted via contact tracing. The 7 days start from the moment he/she was last in close contact with the infected person. On day 5, he/she should get tested. If the individual tests positive, he/she should quarantine for another 7 days. In the event of a negative test, quarantine will end after 7 days.
      With regard to quarantine measures after returning from a trip abroad, please refer to the “International” section of this FAQ.

  • Are visits allowed in residential care centres or residential care institutions?

    Please consult the website of the competent authorities for the terms of the visit:

  • Are specific measures applicable to the transport of disabled persons or persons with reduced mobility?
    The most important thing is that no new social mixing occurs. Transport can therefore continue, but it must be ensured as much as possible that the same combination of drivers and persons with reduced mobility/disabled persons is maintained, subject to hygiene and social distancing measures. Voluntary transport of disabled persons and people in need can continue, and insofar as possible, a minimum distance of 1.5 metres must be maintained between each person. The number of persons that can be transported therefore varies according to the type of vehicle.
  • Will call centres for people in need (suicide risk, domestic violence, etc.) remain available?
    Yes, subject to social distancing measures by the call takers.

Education

  • school children daycare crèches child minders parents classes students teacher class tests assignments training education exam internship graduate degree preteaching parental leave boarding schools university college
  • Do schools remain open?

    Please consult the website of the competent authorities for the terms of resuming education in September:

    In the context of compulsory education and part-time arts education, the specific conditions for organising lessons and schools (number of days at school, requirements for wearing a face mask, external activities, etc.) are determined by the Ministers of Education on the basis of the advice of experts, taking into account the health context and its possible developments.

    If special measures are taken at local level, the Ministers of Education establish a procedure in which the opinion of the experts is sought and in which the competent municipal authority and the relevant stakeholders are involved. Internships will be resumed in line with the pace at which the sectors concerned are restarting.

  • What rules apply in higher education?
    Institutions of higher education can resume their classes and activities in accordance with the guidelines from the Communities and the additional measures from the federal government. In addition, everyone over the age of 12 is obliged to wear a face mask or any other fabric alternative in school buildings. If this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn. Internships will be resumed in line with the pace at which the sectors concerned are restarting.
  • What rules apply in adult education?
    Adult education institutions (including informal adult education) may resume their classes and activities in accordance with the guidelines from the Communities and the additional measures provided by the federal government. The Communities may decide to resume part-time arts education for limited activities, but only where the infrastructure configuration permits this. In addition, everyone over the age of 12 is obliged to wear a face mask or any other fabric alternative in school buildings. If this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn. Internships will be resumed in line with the pace at which the sectors concerned are restarting.
  • Will crèches and child minders remain open?
  • How can child minders apply social distancing?
    The necessary hygienic measures have to be followed but social distancing is difficult with regard to children. Social distancing measures do however have to be strictly observed by parents.
  • What about children of (possibly) infected parents?
    For more information regarding the quarantine measures, please refer to the question above “Which quarantine measures have been relaxed?”
  • Can professional training be resumed?
    This training can be resumed if it complies with the social distancing rules applicable at the company.
  • Can boarding schools, (permanent) children's homes and special needs schools remain open?
    These institutions remain open and may resume their activities and classes in accordance with the guidelines from the Communities and the additional measures from the federal government.
  • May training offered by PCSWs (e.g. group training on handling a limited budget) be resumed?
    This training can be resumed if it complies with the social distancing rules for the local government.
  • May training in the context of evening classes (e.g. cooking lessons and language classes) resume?
    Adult education institutions may resume their classes and activities in accordance with the guidelines from the Communities and the additional measures from the federal government.
  • What is the maximum capacity of an auditorium or lecture hall?

    From 1 September 2020, a maximum of 200 persons may attend lessons in an auditorium. This limit may be exceeded:

    1. if a protocol of the competent authorities provides for a higher capacity;
    2. or when an authorisation has been granted by the municipal authority in agreement with the competent minister(s) after consulting a virologist and in compliance with the protocol in force.

    Classes may resume in accordance with the guidelines from the Communities and the additional measures provided by the federal government.

  • Can academies for music, drama and dance, and art academies resume classes?
    Classes may resume in accordance with the guidelines from the Communities and the additional measures provided by the federal government.

Public services & leisure

  • police justice department prisons post telecommunication Telenet Proximus Orange network sport culture media hotel overnight stay accommodation events tickets cancellation water boat tour ride household waste messages calling sports leisure entertainment free time hobby kayak golf horseback riding horse f ishing tennis city town local authority municipality
  • Which activities are allowed?

    People can move freely within the Belgian territory, but a sense of responsibility and the spirit of solidarity of every citizen is still called upon to adhere to all health recommendations.

    According to the decisions of 9 and 23 July 2020, in addition to the existing obligations, everyone aged 12 and over will also be required to wear a face mask or any other fabric alternative in shops and shopping centres, shopping streets, markets (including flea markets and bric-a-brac), fun fairs and any private or public place with significant footfall, specified by the local authorities, trade fairs (including exhibitions), cinemas, theatres, concert halls and conference rooms, auditoriums, places of worship & reflection, museums, libraries, casinos, amusement arcades and catering establishments (except when customers are sitting at their own table) .

    In these locations, face masks may only be removed for the time strictly necessary for the consumption of food and drink. If consumption takes place in a catering establishment, the catering rules (described above) apply. If this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn.

    For all other establishments mentioned above, wearing a face mask in those areas that are not open to the public is not mandatory under the following two conditions: the areas are completely separate from the areas that are open to the public and this does not contravene any guide or protocol that may be in force.

    Apart from the places mentioned above, it is compulsory to wear a face mask in all situations where it is impossible to ensure compliance with the rules of social distancing.

    Private and public activities of a cultural, social, sporting, tourist and recreational nature can be resumed. The conditions under which these may take place are further explained in this chapter.

    Night clubs and dance halls nevertheless remain closed. Jacuzzis, steam rooms and hammams are only to be used for private purposes.

    Apart from the exceptions mentioned in the Ministerial Order, gatherings of more than 10 people (excluding children younger than 12) are prohibited.

  • Social contacts

    With regard to social contact:

    • people are allowed to see anyone they would like to see, as long as they always respect the social distance of 1.5m and, if that is not possible, wear a face mask.
    • closer contact with anyone who is not part of the household should be kept to a minimum. “Closer contact” implies contact which lasts longer than 15 minutes, without respecting social distancing and without wearing a face mask. During this phase of the epidemic, it is recommended that each person limits themselves to close contact with no more than 5 different people (outside the household) per month.

    Group gatherings are limited to a maximum of ten people, excluding children younger than 12. This applies to all gatherings (not including exceptions stipulated in the Ministerial Order), regardless of whether they take place at home or outdoors (e.g. in a bar, in a cafe or in the park).

  • Are there any specific measures for public transport?
    Public transport remains operational. Public transport users who are 12 years of age or older are obliged to cover their mouths and noses by wearing a face mask or any other fabric alternative. This applies from the moment they enter the airport, station, at stops or on the platform, train or other means of transport organised by a public authority. If it is not possible to wear a face mask for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn. Public transport drivers are not required to cover their nose and mouth, insofar as the driver is well-isolated in a cabin on the one hand, and a poster and/or sticker indicates to users the reason why the driver is not wearing a mask on the other. This exception also applies, under the same conditions, to drivers of organised collective transport (e.g. school bus). Please consult the relevant websites for the available services of transport companies.
  • Are private buses and coaches allowed to organise passenger transport?
    Yes, buses and coaches may arrange organised transport, subject to the application of the necessary hygiene and preventive measures by passengers and transport companies. Passengers from the age of 12 must cover their mouth and nose by wearing a face mask or any other fabric alternative and, where possible, keep a distance of 1.5 metres. If it is not possible to wear a face mask for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn.
  • What about taxis (and other on-demand transport services)?
    Taxis are allowed to transport customers. A minimum distance of 1.5 metres must be maintained between each person. The number of persons that can be transported therefore varies according to the type of vehicle. A household or people who belong to “the closer contacts” can travel in 1 car. In this case, the social distancing rule does not apply. It is recommended to regularly ventilate and clean the vehicle. It is mandatory to wear a face mask to cover your nose and mouth, if the social distancing measures cannot be respected.
  • What measures have been taken with regard to carpooling? How many people are allowed to travel in a private car?
    As is the case for taxis a minimum distance of 1.5 metres between each person must be respected during transport. The number of persons that can be transported therefore varies according to the type of vehicle. This rule does not apply to people belonging to the same household or “the closer contacts”. It is recommended to ventilate and clean the car regularly. It is mandatory to wear a face mask to cover your nose and mouth, if the social distancing measures cannot be respected.
  • Is social distancing respected when a flexible transparent screen is installed in means of transport (vans) where the 1.5 m distance cannot be guaranteed?
    Yes, a transparent screen provides adequate protection and installing one can be permitted in means of transport, provided that certain road safety requirements are met.
  • What about tourism?
    Tourism and tourist activities are allowed throughout Belgian territory. All types of accommodation (hotels, Airbnb, cottages, campsites, etc.) may be opened subject to compliance with the applicable protocols with a maximum of 10 people (not including children under the age of 12). Everyone must respect the advice in terms of “closer contacts”. Any restaurants or bars of these facilities may be opened if the measures provided for the catering (horeca) industry (see the section on the catering (horeca) industry, in the chapter on Economy) are respected. Night clubs and dance halls must remain closed for the time being.
  • Which sports are allowed?

    All sports activities can take place, subject to compliance with the applicable protocols, indoor and outdoor, amateur or professional, and at least under the following conditions: Sports activities in a non-organised context:

    these activities may only be carried out within one’s social bubble, i.e. with a maximum of 10 people (excluding children under the age of 12). Sports activities in an organised context (i.e. in a club or association):

    These activities may take place

    • with a maximum of 50 people ;
    • always in the presence of an adult trainer, coach or supervisor;

    Sports competitions

    Sports competitions can be held. There is no limit to the number of participants, unless the applicable protocol or the competent municipal authority explicitly provides for it. If a sporting competition is organised for more than 200 participants or on public roads, the prior authorisation of the competent municipal authority is required. Before submitting the application, the organiser fills in the online COVID Event Risk Model (CERM) application (www.covideventriskmodel.be) and attaches the complete obtained certificate to the application file for the competent municipal authority.

    A maximum number of spectators is permitted:

    • 200 if the competition takes place indoors;
    • 400 if the competition takes place outdoors.

    The maximum number of spectators along the side of a sports event is limited in the arrival and departure zone:

    • 200 if the competition takes place indoors;
    • 400 if the competition takes place outdoors.

    Spectators are required to wear a face mask in all situations where it is impossible to ensure compliance with the rules of social distancing.

    If a sporting competition is organised on public roads, the prior authorisation of the competent municipal authority is required.

    Competitions organised on a regular basis in permanent infrastructures such as stadiums, sports fields and sports halls may be organised in accordance with the protocol in force and are therefore not subject to prior authorisation.

    The competent municipal authority may give the operators of permanent infrastructures (e.g. stadium) permission to accommodate a seated audience that exceeds the number of people mentioned above in agreement with the competent minister(s), after consulting a virologist and in compliance with the protocol in force. The application must be addressed to the competent mayor.

    No sports events can take place between 1 am and 6 am.

  • Is the registration of participants' contact details mandatory at a sports competition or tournament?
    The registration of participants' contact details is mandatory for group sports lessons, but not for sports competitions or tournaments. Sports club cafeterias must comply with the rules applicable to the catering industry, hence the obligation to register customers also applies to them.
  • Can I rehearse with my amateur theatre company, dance group, orchestra, choir, etc.?

    Certain lessons and rehearsals may take place subject to conditions. These conditions are laid down in the protocols of the competent minister.

    These activities should always take place in an organised context, i.e. in group or organised by an association and should always be:

    • in the presence of an adult supervisor;
    • with a group of up to fifty people.

    Different rules may apply to professional artists (professional dancers, professional actors, etc.). In this case, a risk analysis and action plan must be drawn up at an individual level. On this basis, it can be assessed whether it is safe (and feasible) to restart the activity and the necessary measures can be taken to organise everything in the safest possible way.

  • Are cultural performances with an audience allowed?

    Performances organised on a regular basis in permanent infrastructures such as theatres, cinemas and cultural centres can be organised according to the protocol in force.

    For one-off performances on the public road, the prior authorisation of the competent municipal authority is required. Before submitting the application, the organiser fills in the online COVID Event Risk Model (CERM) application (www.covideventriskmodel.be) and attaches the complete obtained certificate to the application file for the competent municipal authority.

    All these events are subject to a capacity limit:

    • 200 people inside;
    • 400 people outside.

    As from 1 September 2020, the competent municipal authority may give the operators of permanent infrastructures (e.g. theatres and concert halls) permission to accommodate a seated audience that exceeds the number of people mentioned above in agreement with the competent minister(s), after consulting a virologist and in compliance with the protocol in force. The application must be addressed to the competent mayor.

    Performances may not take place between 1 am and 6 am.

    In addition, everyone over the age of 12 is obliged to wear a face mask or any other fabric alternative in theatres and concert halls. Apart from in these places, it is compulsory to wear a face mask in all situations where it is impossible to ensure compliance with the rules of social distancing. If this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn. Wearing a face mask is not mandatory for stage performers.

    In these locations, face masks may only be removed for the time strictly necessary for the consumption of food and drink. If consumption takes place in a catering establishment, the catering rules (described above) apply. In those areas of cinemas, theatres and concert halls that are not open to the public, it is not compulsory to wear a face mask under the following two conditions: the areas are completely separate from the areas that are open to the public and it does not contravene any guide or protocol that may be in force.

  • Can amateur recordings take place?

    These recordings may take place on condition that this is done:

    • in an organised context, namely in a company or association;
    • with a group of no more than fifty people, and respecting a distance of 1.5 metres between each person;
  • Can general meetings or other meetings of clubs or associations take place?
    Yes, these are considered to be organised activities of clubs and associations and can therefore take place with a maximum of 50 people taking into account the social distancing measures.
  • Can general meetings of co-owners take place?
    A general meeting of co-owners is considered to be a professional activity, therefore, there is no maximum number of participants. However, we urge you to adhere to the social distancing and hygiene guidelines, as specified in the sector guide of the professional association. The number of participants can also be limited by proxy, if necessary. Finally, it can be confirmed that an evolutionary interpretation of Section 577-6 of the Civil Code allows co-owners to participate remotely in the general meeting (e.g. via video link).
  • How about events?

    Events are allowed under strict conditions.

    It is compulsory to wear a face mask in all situations where it is impossible to ensure compliance with social distancing rules. When it is not possible to wear a face mask or any fabric alternative due to medical reasons, a face shield can be worn.

    All these events are subject to a capacity limit:

    • 200 people inside;
    • 400 people outside.

    In order to limit the further spread of the virus, each event must comply with certain rules.

    • For events on public roads, it will suffice to:

    • For events which do not take place on public roads and for which no protocol applies, the eight minimum rules must be adhered to. As a reminder, below are the eight minimum rules:

      • The company or association must inform its customers and employees in good time regarding the preventive measures in force and provide the employees with appropriate training.
      • A distance of 1.5 meters between each person must be ensured;
      • Face masks and other personal protective equipment are always strongly recommended within businesses and associations and must be used in these places if the rules of social distancing cannot be complied with, due to the nature of the activity performed;
      • The activity must be organised in such a way as to avoid gatherings;
      • The company or association must provide staff and customers with the means to ensure the necessary hand hygiene;
      • The company or association must take the appropriate hygiene measures to regularly disinfect the workplace and the material used;
      • The company or association must ensure good ventilation of the workplace;
      • A contact person must be designated and announced so that customers and staff can report a possible coronavirus infection, in order to facilitate contact tracing.

    Where food and drink are offered for consumption on the spot, the protocol and catering rules shall apply.

    Finally, no events can take place between 1 am and 6 am.

    One-time events An online application (COVID Event Risk Model) has been made available (www.covideventriskmodel.be), which serves as a reference for local authorities when granting permits for these events. It is the responsibility of the organiser to fill in all the data in the application and to deliver the results (in the form of a certificate) to the municipal authorities. A positive outcome from the CERM only gives an indication and is therefore not an automatic consent. The municipal authority includes the results in the multidisciplinary risk analysis before granting the admission decision.

    On public roads:

    • the CERM is mandatory
    • Applicable sector and CERM protocols
    • permission from the mayor is required

    Not on public roads:

    • the CERM is recommended
    • If no protocol is applicable, the eight minimum rules must be adhered to.

    Events on a regular basis For events organised on a regular basis in permanent infrastructures such as theatres, cinemas, stadiums, congress halls, protocols have been established with the relevant ministers and GEES experts. As from 1 September 2020, the competent municipal authority may give the operators of permanent infrastructures permission to accommodate a seated audience that exceeds the number of people mentioned above in agreement with the competent minister(s), after consulting a virologist and in compliance with the protocol in force. The application must be addressed to the competent mayor.

  • Can a conference be organised?

    Yes, these are considered as an event and can be organised according to the above-mentioned rules in force for events. In addition, company seminars can be organised for their employees under the same conditions as those for conferences. Where food and drink are offered for consumption on the spot, the protocol and catering rules shall apply. In addition, everyone over the age of 12 is obliged to wear a face mask or any other fabric alternative in conference rooms and auditoriums. If this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn.

    In these locations, face masks may only be removed for the time strictly necessary for the consumption of food and drink. If consumption takes place in a catering establishment, the catering rules (described above) apply. In those areas of conference rooms and auditoriums that are not open to the public, it is not compulsory to wear a face mask under the following two conditions: the areas are completely separate from the areas that are open to the public and it does not contravene any guide or protocol that may be in force.

  • How about demonstrations?

    Demonstrations on public roads are allowed with a maximum of 200 participants (400 from 1 September 2020). For demonstrations, permission must always be requested from the competent municipal authority. Before submitting the application, the organiser fills in the online COVID Event Risk Model (CERM) application (www.covideventriskmodel.be) and attaches the complete obtained certificate to the application file for the competent municipal authority.

    In any case, the demonstrations must always be static and take place in a place where the safety distances can be respected. It is compulsory to wear a face mask in all situations where it is impossible to ensure compliance with social distancing rules.

    Demonstrations may not take place between 1 am and 6 am.

  • How about receptions and banquets?

    The applicable rules differ depending on whether or not a professional caterer is used for the receptions or banquets. The following rules apply to receptions and banquets that are not catered for by a professional caterer:

    • Private receptions and banquets without a professional caterer can be organised for a maximum of 10 people (not including children under 12 years of age). This applies to dinners among friends, family, etc.

    The following rules apply to seated receptions and banquets that are catered for by a professional caterer:

    For seated receptions and banquets catered for by a professional caterer, there are no restrictions on the number of guests, as long as the following catering rules are followed:

    • the tables must be positioned in such a way that a distance of at least 1.5 meters between the tables is guaranteed, unless the tables are separated by a plexiglass wall or an equivalent alternative with a minimum height of 1.8 meters
    • a maximum of ten people per table is allowed
    • only seats at tables are allowed
    • wearing a face mask is mandatory for staff in the premises (if this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn)
    • wearing a face mask is mandatory for kitchen staff (if this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn)
    • no service is allowed at the bar, with the exception of sole traders, and subject to a distance of 1.5 meters
    • terraces and public spaces must be organised in accordance with the rules laid down by the municipal authorities and in compliance with the same rules as those that apply indoors
    • bars and restaurants may remain open between their usual opening hours and 1 am, unless the municipal authorities require them to close earlier. In addition, they must remain closed during 5 consecutive hours
    • the contact details of one customer per table, which may be limited to a telephone number or an email address, must be recorded on arrival and kept for 14 calendar days, to facilitate any subsequent contact tracing. These contact details may only be used for the purposes of tackling COVID-19, they must be destroyed after 14 calendar days and customers must give their express consent. Customers who refuse to complete their details will be refused entry to the establishment.

    In addition, catering establishments that organise seated receptions and banquets must ensure:

    • to inform its customers and employees regarding the preventive measures in force and provide the employees with appropriate training.
    • to provide staff and customers with the means to ensure the necessary hand hygiene
    • to take the appropriate hygiene measures to regularly disinfect the workplace and the material used;
    • good ventilation of the workplace;
    • to designate and announce a contact person so that customers and staff can report a possible coronavirus infection, in order to facilitate contact tracing.

    As such, wedding receptions, neighbourhood parties, sponsor dinners/spaghetti evenings, company receptions, etc. can be catered for by a professional caterer. Receptions and banquets organised in a restaurant or a hotel are also considered to be ‘catered for by a professional catering company’.

    It is, however, compulsory to wear a face mask in all situations where social distancing measures cannot be respected. Dancing at these receptions and banquets is still not permitted at this stage, with the exception of weddings where only the newlyweds are allowed to perform a traditional opening dance.

    Furthermore, when seated banquets and receptions are organised on public roads, prior authorisation of the competent municipal authority is required. Before submitting the application, the organiser fills in the online COVID Event Risk Model (CERM) application (www.covideventriskmodel.be) and attaches the complete obtained certificate to the application file for the competent municipal authority. In addition, banquets and receptions may not be held between 1am and 6am.

  • Can indoor play areas open?
    Yes, they are allowed to carry on their activities according to the protocol in force.
  • Are camps and activity clubs allowed?

    Yes, these activities may be organised subject to authorisation by the municipal authorities from 1 July 2020 for one or more groups of up to fifty people, including participants and supervisors. These groups must each form a separate social bubble during summer camp. All activities must be organised by social bubble and groups must not be put together, except in situations where a larger group is allowed. All forms of camps are allowed (sports, artistic, language and youth camps). There is no limit on the number of camps in which a child may participate. Summer camps may be organised up to a maximum of 150 kilometres from the Belgian borders, provided that the host country does not prohibit this and with the exception of the areas designated as red zones, specified on the website of the FPS Foreign Affairs. For transportation to and from the camp in a bus, one bubble must be maintained. The full capacity may be used on condition that the driver is protected. The bus must be sufficiently ventilated during the journey and fully disinfected after use. Children and adolescents do not need to wear a face mask. For double-decker buses, one bubble can be transported per deck, provided that the air flows between the two levels are separated. It must be ensured that bubbles are kept separate when passengers get on and off. If more than one bubble (per deck) is transported, the general rules on bus transport apply.

    Specifically for the youth sector there are protocols approved by the GEES. More information about the youth work rules for summer 2020 can be found at: https://ambrassade.be/nl/jeugdwerkzomer/jeugdwerkregels.

  • Can the regular activities of youth movements, STEM academies, youth centres and youth centres resume?
    Yes, these activities are allowed as long as they take place with a group of maximum 50 people, always in the presence of an adult supervisor, and with respect for a distance of 1.5 meters between each person older than 12 years. Youth houses and youth centres can reopen under the conditions described above for (youth) activities or, if necessary, also on the basis of the rules relating to the catering (horeca) industry.
  • Under what conditions can civil marriages take place?
    They can take place in the presence of up to 200 people, subject to social distancing measures. Receptions or banquets held after the ceremony must follow the above mentioned rules for private receptions and banquets. It is compulsory to wear a face mask in all situations where it is impossible to ensure compliance with social distancing rules.
  • Can faith-based services continue?

    Religious services and faith-based gatherings (weekly or daily as well as services or celebrations on the occasion of births, baptisms, marriages and deaths) may be resumed, subject, among other things, to the following rules:

    • the safety distance of 1.5 metres must be respected with observance of a predetermined maximum number of people per building, with a maximum of 100 people per building (200 from 1 September 2020);
    • Physical contact between people and with objects touched by different participants is prohibited;
    • The provision of means to ensure the necessary hand hygiene at the entrance and exit.
    • Anyone aged 12 and over is obliged to wear a face mask or any other safe, fabric alternative in places of worship & reflection and in all situations where it is impossible to ensure compliance with the rules of social distancing. If this is not possible for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn. In those areas of places of worship & reflection that are not open to the public, it is not compulsory to wear a face mask under the following two conditions: the areas are completely separate from the areas that are open to the public and it does not contravene any guide or protocol that may be in force.
  • Is it allowed to organise a ceremony somewhere else (for example, outdoors)?
    These can take place but always with respect for the social distancing measures (1.5 meters between persons) and with a maximum of 100 people (200 from 1 September 2020) and without the possibility of exposing the body. Funeral receptions must follow the above-mentioned rules for private receptions and banquets. They can therefore only be organised for a maximum of 10 people according to the social bubble rule. From 1 September 2020, funeral receptions may be organised for a maximum of 50 people, subject to compliance with the rules applicable to the hospitality sector.
  • What rules apply to funerals and cremations?
    These can take place but always with respect for the social distancing measures (1.5 meters between individuals) and with a maximum of 200people and without the possibility of exposing the body. Funeral receptions may be organised for a maximum of 50 people, subject to compliance with the rules applicable to the hospitality sector. If the funeral reception is catered for by a professional caterer, an unlimited number of participants may be present. In this case, the above-mentioned rules for private receptions and banquets must be respected.
  • When should the COVID Event Risk Model be used?

    This application should be used for:

    • all events, performances and sports competitions on public roads;
    • demonstrations;
    • sports competitions
      • with more than 200 participants:
      • or on public roads; It is the responsibility of the organiser to fill in all the data in the application and to deliver the results (in the form of a certificate) to the municipal authorities. The result of the CERM is indicative, it helps the organiser to identify additional appropriate measures to ensure the safety of visitors. It helps the municipal authorities make the admission decision. In all other cases, it is recommended that the organiser use the CERM tool to identify the appropriate measures. However, this is not mandatory.

Transport & International

  • driving license driver’s license tires tyre change garage public transport train tram bus metro premetro plane station airport harbor port harbour bike taxi carpool cruise sharing boat sailing boat moving transportation borders abroad
  • What are the general principles that apply to international travel?
    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply after your return to Belgium. These are published on a map on the Foreign Affairs website: https://diplomatie.belgium.be. Click on the region you are travelling from and a text box with the measures in place will appear. Please note: the colour on the map is the colour of the travel advice to that country. You must click on the region to see which return conditions apply.
  • Travelling from Belgium

    It is possible to travel from Belgium. However, entry into the country of destination also depends on the consent of the country in question.

    All over the world, countries are, to a greater or lesser extent, exposed to COVID-19. A colour-coded system shows the degree of risk within each zone. Furthermore, countries may also impose restrictions on travellers from Belgium. All the information for travellers is compiled on the website of the FPS Foreign Affairs on a map supplemented with travel advice for each country.

    Travel advice is highly subject to change and travel to a destination may be discouraged at any time. If you are planning to make an essential journey abroad, it is highly recommended to consult the travel advice from Foreign Affairs, which is continually updated: https://diplomatie.belgium.be/en/services/travelling_abroad/travel_advice_by_country

    People travelling abroad should be aware that new COVID-19 breeding grounds abroad can greatly affect their trip and that repatriation cannot be guaranteed if commercial flights are cancelled or borders closed. The FPS Foreign Affairs uses colour codes on its home page to indicate whether travel to a particular country or zone is possible. On this website, you will find a map and a table, showing the same information, as well as detailed information about each country.

    Below are the COVID-19 colours, based on information from CELEVAL and the FPS Public Health: Select and click on a country or region. The corresponding measures appear. Then click on the country name for detailed travel advice. Please consult this advice before and during your trip.

    • Red: travelling to these countries/zones is strongly advised against by the Belgian authorities due to the unfavourable epidemiological situation; OR the authorities of the country have banned non-essential travel from Belgium.

    • Orange: travelling to these countries/zones is possible, however, the Belgian authorities recommend increased vigilance due to the unfavourable epidemiological situation.

    • Light Orange: travel is possible, however, the authorities of this country impose a COVID-19 test and/or quarantine on travellers from Belgium.

    • Green: travel is possible without additional restrictions. However, it remains important to follow the travel advice. Hygiene and social distancing rules still apply.

    The FPS Foreign Affairs' travel advice also contains a series of specific recommendations for each destination.

  • Travelling to Belgium : Are you a Belgian citizen or a citizen of the EU, the Schengen Area or the UK or resident in Belgium, the EU, the Schengen Area or the UK or a relative of any of the above-mentioned individuals?

    You may always travel or return to Belgium, regardless of the country of departure.

    In the event of a resurgence of the virus, it is possible that additional measures will come into force when you return from certain zones.

    The Belgian approach for people returning from abroad depends on whether they are returning from a red, orange or green zone. Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply after your return to Belgium. These zones are published on a map on the Foreign Affairs website: https://diplomatie.belgium.be. Click on the region you are travelling from and a text box with the measures in place will appear.

    • Red zones are municipalities, districts, cities, regions or countries which have been put back into lockdown by the country in question or where people are at a very high risk of infection based on the epidemiological criteria identified by CELEVAL. People returning from these zones will be treated as “high-risk contacts”, which means that they will have to be tested and must stay in quarantine upon their return. For more information about possible quarantine, please refer to the question: “When should people travelling from abroad stay in quarantine?”.

    • Orange zones are municipalities, districts, cities, regions or countries for which a moderately high risk of infection has been identified by CELEVAL based on epidemiological criteria. Persons returning from these zones will be asked to undergo testing and stay in quarantine. This is, however, a strong recommendation and not an obligation.

    • Green zones are municipalities, districts, cities, regions or countries where no or low health risks has been identified by CELEVAL based on epidemiological criteria. People travelling are not subject to additional measures. However, it remains important to follow the travel advice. Hygiene and social distancing rules still apply.

    Please note: the colour on the map is the colour of the travel advice to that country. You must click on the region to see which return conditions apply.

    All persons travelling must also fill in a “Public Health Passenger Locator Form”. For more information about this, please refer to the question: ‘When should I fill in a “Public Health Passenger Locator Form”?’

  • Travelling to Belgium : You are not a Belgian citizen but resident of a country outside the EU, the Schengen Area and the UK and you are travelling to Belgium from countries mentioned on the FPS Foreign Affairs website?

    It is possible to travel from these countries to Belgium. Please consult the table at: https://diplomatie.belgium.be/en/services/travel_to_belgium

    The Belgian approach for people returning from abroad depends on whether they are returning from a red, orange or green zone. Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply after your return to Belgium. These zones are published on a map on the Foreign Affairs website: https://diplomatie.belgium.be. Click on the region you are travelling from and a text box with the measures in place will appear.

    When the ban on non-essential travel is gradually lifted, it will be possible to travel to Belgium from the countries published on the website of Foreign Affairs. The list is reviewed every two weeks by the EU and the Belgian position will be published thereafter.

  • Travelling to Belgium : You are not a Belgian citizen but resident of a country outside the EU, the Schengen Area and the UK and you are travelling to Belgium from countries that are not mentioned on the FPS Foreign Affairs website

    Non-essential travel from these countries to Belgium is prohibited. Please consult the list at: https://diplomatie.belgium.be/en/services/travel_to_belgium

    These countries are considered red zones:

    • Red zones are municipalities, districts, cities, regions or countries which have been put back into lockdown by the country in question or where people are at a very high risk of infection based on the epidemiological criteria identified by CELEVAL.

    People returning from these zones will be treated as “high-risk contacts”, which means that they will have to be tested and must stay in quarantine upon their return.

    For more information about possible quarantine, please refer to the question: “When should people travelling from abroad stay in quarantine?”

    The temporary travel restrictions do not apply to key workers or people travelling for compelling reasons such as:

    1. Health professionals, health researchers and professionals providing care for the elderly travelling for work;
    2. Frontier workers travelling for work;
    3. Seasonal agricultural workers travelling for work;
    4. Transport staff travelling for work;
    5. Diplomats, staff of international organisations and people invited by international organisations whose physical presence is required for the proper functioning of those organisations, military staff, Federal Police staff, Civil Protection staff, police officials, Immigration Office staff, customs staff and humanitarian staff, when performing their duties;
    6. Passengers in transit, irrespective of where they are travelling from;
    7. Passengers travelling for compelling family reasons, i.e.:
    • travel justified by family reunification
    • visits to a legal spouse or partner, when both do not live together for professional or personal reasons
    • travel to an unregistered partner who does not live under the same roof
    • travel in the context of co-parenting
    • travel in the context of funerals or cremations (kinship = first and second degree)
    • travel in the context of civil and religious marriages (kinship = first and second degree)
    1. Mariners travelling for work;
    2. People travelling for humanitarian reasons; This includes travel for compelling medical reasons or to continue urgent medical treatment as well as to provide assistance or care to an elderly, minor, disabled or vulnerable person;
    3. People travelling for study purposes; This includes travel by pupils, students and trainees who are undergoing training as part of their studies and researchers with a hosting agreement
    4. Highly qualified professionals travelling for economically necessary reasons which cannot be postponed; including professional sportsmen and sportswomen with elite sport status and cultural sector professionals with a combined licence, travelling for work;

    PLEASE NOTE: These specific conditions are in addition to the normal conditions of access to Belgium. It is, for instance, important to always take into account which visa procedures are in force. For passengers requiring a visa to come to Belgium, it should be noted that, due to COVID-19, some visa procedures have not (yet) resumed in all places. Finally, passengers can only enter Belgium or the EU if they comply with existing EU and national regulations, which determine the conditions under which third-country nationals can enter the territory. This is independent of the specific restrictions or measures temporarily in place for public health reasons within the COVID-19 context. For citizens of countries not requiring a visa, the following rules apply: the person must travel with an essential journey certificate. This certificate is issued by the competent Belgian embassy or consulate if it is proven that the journey is essential. An essential journey certificate is not mandatory if the essential nature of the journey is evidenced by the traveller’s documents. For example: seamen (Seaman’s Discharge Book), transit passengers (airline ticket) and diplomats (diplomatic passport). For more information about this procedure, please go to: https://dofi.ibz.be/sites/dvzoe/NL/Gidsvandeprocedures/Pages/Reizen%20naar%20België.aspx

    People returning from red zones will be treated as “high-risk contacts”, which means that they will have to be tested and must stay in quarantine upon their return. For more information about possible quarantine, please refer to the question: {2}“When should people travelling from abroad stay in quarantine?”{2}

    All persons travelling to Belgium will also have to fill in a “Public Health Passenger Locator Form”. For more information about this, please refer to the question: ‘When should I fill in a “Public Health Passenger Locator Form”?’

  • May I visit my partner in Belgium?

    Visiting a partner who does not live under the same roof is considered an essential journey as from 1 September. However, it is subject to a number of conditions: prior to the application (citizens of countries requiring a visa) or the planned travel date (citizens of countries not requiring a visa), you must:

    • provide evidence of having lived together for 6 months in Belgium or another country
    • or provide evidence of having a relationship of at least 1 year during which the partners have seen each other physically at least twice and for a minimum duration of 20 days. If a visit had to be postponed due to the COVID-19 measures, providing evidence of a planned visit can count for the second visit;
    • or have a child together.

    The partner abroad must apply for a visa or proof of essential travel (if not subject to visa requirements) via the Belgian diplomatic post. Where possible, the diplomatic post will issue these visas or proofs. The file will be handed over to the immigration service should this not be the case.

    • complete the Passenger Locator Form no earlier than 48 hours before arriving in Belgium. In addition, you will have to be tested and must stay in quarantine for 14 days upon your return from a red zone.
  • When should I fill in a “Public Health Passenger Locator Form” (PLF)?

    Since 1 August 2020, ALL travellers to Belgium, regardless of the means of transport chosen, must complete the “Public Health Passenger Locator Form” no earlier than 48 hours before arriving in Belgium, except when the time spent abroad was less than 48 hours or the time spent in Belgium will be less than 48 hours.

    • Exception: Passengers using a public or private air carrier or a public or private maritime transport service must ALWAYS complete the PLF document in order to board, regardless of the length of their visit abroad or in Belgium. The PLF should be completed electronically where possible. However, if it is not possible for the passenger to use the electronic Passenger Locator Form (e-PLF), the passenger is obliged to use the paper version of the Passenger Locator Form.

    The PLF is available on the e-Health website of the Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment; and of the Federal Public Service Foreign Affairs and of the Immigration Office and the Federal Public Service Foreign Affairs.

    This form allows you to contact the person travelling if an infection is detected and to start contact tracing.

    It is mandatory to fill in the “Public Health Passenger Locator Form” completely and truthfully. Failure to complete this form may result in criminal prosecution and refusal of entry into the territory.

    A separate form must be completed for each passenger aged 16 years and over. The details of children under the age of 16 must be filled in on the form of an accompanying adult, if this is the case. If children under the age of 16 are travelling alone, they must also fill in a form.

    If the information entered on the form changes within 14 days of arrival, you must report this preferably by filling in a new e-PLF via https://travel.info-coronavirus.be/ with the complete and updated details. If you are using the paper version, please e-mail the modified version to PLFBelgium@health.fgov.be.

    A. If the passenger travels by means of transport (plane or boat): The carrier is obliged to check that all passengers have completed a Passenger Locator Form prior to boarding. If the PLF has not been completed, the carrier is obliged to refuse boarding. The authorities responsible for border checks may request to see and check the Passenger Locator Form at all times.

    • Electronic version The e-PLF (https://travel.info-coronavirus.be/) must be completed via the e-Health website of the Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment. After the passenger has submitted the form, Saniport will send a receipt by email, which is a PDF document with QR code. The passenger must present this document to the carrier on departure.

    If you are a high-risk contact, for instance when travelling from a red zone, you will receive a text message with a code to go to a triage point or lab for a test upon your arrival in Belgium.

    Passengers travelling from a country within the Schengen Area will have to show their form and hand it over to the carrier when boarding. Passengers travelling from a country outside the Schengen Area must hand in their form upon arrival at the border control.

    B. If the passenger is not travelling by plane or boat but uses another means of transport (train, bus, car, bicycle, etc.) to travel to Belgium: The authorities responsible for border checks may request to see and check the Passenger Locator Form at all times.

    • Electronic version The e-PLF (https://travel.info-coronavirus.be/) must be completed via the e-Health website of the Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment; and of the Federal Public Service Foreign Affairs and of the Immigration Office and the Federal Public Service Foreign Affairs. After the passenger has submitted the form, Saniport will send a receipt by email, which is a PDF document with QR code.

    If you are a high-risk contact, for instance when travelling from a red zone, you will receive a text message with a code to go to a triage point or lab for a test upon your arrival in Belgium.

    The PLF must be submitted as soon as possible upon arrival in Belgium (within 12 hours). This can be done by e-mailing it to PLFBelgium@health.fgov.be or by copying the data from the paper version into the electronic version of the Passenger Locator Form.

  • What does 'quarantine' mean?

    Quarantine means staying indoors (including garden or terrace) in a single place, which must be specified in advance via the “Public Health Passenger Locator Form”. This can be a private address (with family or with friends), or another place to stay, such as a hotel. If the person falls ill, all members of the same household are close contacts.

    The period of 14 days starts as soon as the person travelling arrives in Belgium, unless otherwise determined by the attending physician/decree of the federated entities.

    The specification of the applicable rules for each community/region can be found here:

    During this period, contact with other people, including people in the same house, must be completely avoided (always keep a distance of 1.5m).

    • Towels, bed linen and eating or drinking utensils should not be shared with the other members of the same household and, if possible, the person should use a separate toilet and bathroom.
    • Quarantine in an environment with people at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19 is not recommended (e.g. people older than 65, people with a serious underlying medical condition such as severe heart, lung or kidney disease, people with decreased immunity).

    No visits are allowed.

    Working and going to school is not allowed, with the exclusion of the exceptions mentioned below. Teleworking is permitted.

    For all journeys (from the time of arrival in Belgium) the use of public transport must be avoided.

    The health situation must be closely monitored. If symptoms of COVID-19 appear, the local GP must be contacted immediately.

    It is mandatory to be reachable and cooperate with the health authorities throughout the quarantine period.

    Going outside is only allowed for the following essential trips and provided that you wear a (fabric) face mask:

    • Urgent medical attention;
    • Purchase of basic necessities, such as food and medicines, but only if no one else can provide them and by exception;
    • Settling urgent legal/financial issues;
    • For key workers or people who have a recognised compelling reason whose essential activities cannot be postponed until after the period of quarantine has ended, e.g. the funeral of a family member.
  • What is the difference between quarantine and isolation?

    If you are required to go into quarantine, it is for a period of 14 days. At that moment, there is only a suspicion that you may be carrier of the virus, you are not (yet) ill. For example, you have been in close contact with someone who tested positive, have been in an area with high virus circulation (“red zone”), or in an orange zone, where you engaged in “risky activities” such as family visits or nightlife. If you are required to go into isolation, it is for a period of 7 days. That’s what happens when you’re ill or have tested positive. From the moment the symptoms appear, you will be contagious for no more than 7 days.

    Additional measures to be taken in case of self-isolation:

    • Wear a face mask at home to protect your housemates
    • Stay as much as possible in a well-ventilated separate room to control the spread of the virus
    • Ask others for help with your shopping
    • You do not have to wait to be contacted by the call centre for contact tracing, instead you can contact them yourself.
  • When should travellers stay in quarantine when travelling from Belgium abroad?
    Each country is entitled to impose quarantine measures to people entering its territory. It is, therefore, highly recommended to consult the travel advice of the FPS Foreign Affairs: https://diplomatie.belgium.be/en/services/travelling_abroad/travel_advice_by_country
  • When should travellers stay in quarantine when travelling to Belgium from abroad?

    Quarantine is a competence of the federated entities. More information can be found on the website of the federated entities.

    In Belgium, staying in quarantine and taking a COVID-19 test is required for travellers who return from red zones. This is highly recommended for people returning from orange zones. These zones are published on the website of the FPS Foreign Affairs.

    Quarantine is also mandatory for essential trips from red zones. This may only be deviated from if staying in quarantine would prevent the ‘essential aspect’ of the trip from going ahead. Quarantine can therefore only be lifted in order to fulfil the essential purpose of the trip and only to the extent that this activity cannot be postponed.

    For example: a foreign student must stay in quarantine for two weeks before starting his/her studies, a person travelling to a funeral can attend the funeral, however, he/she must stay in quarantine for the remainder of his/her stay.

    During these activities, social distancing and other protective measures must be respected at all times.

    For all activities not related to the reason for essential travel, the individual must remain in quarantine.

  • What are the exceptions to the quarantine measures?

    Quarantine is a competence of the federated entities. More information can be found on the website of the federated entities.

    Persons arriving in Belgium from a red zone and who have essential work or a compelling reason in the categories listed below do not have to stay in quarantine:

    1. Border residents;
    2. Transport staff responsible for the transport of goods and other transport personnel, to the extent necessary in the performance of their duties;
    3. Diplomats, staff of international organisations and people invited by international organisations whose physical presence is required for the proper functioning of those organisations, military staff, police officials, Immigration Office staff, customs staff, humanitarian staff and civil protection staff, when performing their duties;
    4. Passengers in transit, irrespective of where they are travelling from;
    5. Mariners in the performance of their duties;
    6. Highly qualified people travelling for economically necessary reasons which cannot be postponed, including professional sportsmen and sportswomen, when performing their duties;
    7. Pupils, students and trainees who travel abroad on a daily basis.

    For short-stay travel (less than 48 hours) in Belgium or abroad, please tick the relevant box on the Passenger Locator Form and no text message will be sent. No test is required and you do not need to quarantine.

  • When should I get tested?

    People returning from red zones will be treated as “high-risk contacts”, which means that they will have to be tested upon their return

    There is no exception to performing a test, except when the PLF does not need to be completed, a person has been abroad for less than 48 hours or will be in Belgium for less than 48 hours (to be indicated on the PLF) and no activation code has been received.

  • Are specific measures taken for Belgian airports?
    The social distancing measures and the specific measures in force at the airport must be respected. Anyone aged 12 and over is obliged to cover their mouth and nose with a mask or any other fabric alternative, as soon as they enter the airport. If it is not possible to wear a face mask for medical reasons, a face shield can be worn.
    For further information on the measures in force, passengers should consult the websites of the respective airports.
  • What happens if the travel advice is ignored? What about travel insurance if these people fall ill while travelling?
    The general terms and conditions of a specific travel insurance policy determine the cases in which the travel insurance intervenes. If you ignore the advice not to travel and fall ill at your holiday destination, the general terms and conditions of your travel insurance policy will stipulate whether there will be cover for medical and/or repatriation costs. In the majority of the cases, there will be no cover. With regard to hospitalisation insurance, the general terms and conditions will also specify the conditions under which the hospitalisation insurer intervenes abroad.

Didn’t find an answer to your question?

Consult the information available on the websites of the competent authorities or call 0800 14 689.