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Current measures

Current measures

The government has set rules to stop the spread of coronavirus. Follow these rules. This way, you will avoid becoming ill or making others ill. Thank you for following them. Together we’ll stop the coronavirus. The rules are valid until June 7th.

Journeys

  • You are only allowed outside if it is necessary. You are allowed to go to
    • your work
    • the doctor
    • the pharmacy
    • the shop
    • someone who needs your help, e.g. someone needing to go to the hospital.
    • an outdoor space where you can exercise
    • your second residence (in Belgium)
    • visit your family and friends who are in your new social bubble.
    • all organisations and services that are open, such as hairdressers and libraries

Abroad

  • You are not allowed to travel.
  • The borders are closed. You’re only allowed to cross the border for certain journeys.

Public transport

  • Walk or go by bicycle, moped, car, … as much as possible.
  • If you are using public transport (bus, tram or train) and you are older than 12 years of age, you must wear a face mask or use a scarf to cover your mouth and nose.

Do you have a question about journeys ?

Work

  • Work from home if possible.
  • If you have to go into work, your employer must ensure that you are able to maintain a distance of 1.5 metres from others.
  • If this is not possible, more information can be found in this guide.

Do you have a question about employment?

Shops and catering sector

  • All shops are open.
  • Night shops are open until 10:00 p.m.
  • Markets are open. A maximum of 50 stalls are allowed on the market.
  • You can go to the hairdresser or beautician.
    • You must make an appointment
    • You must wear a face mask
  • Pubs and restaurants stay closed.
  • Do you own a shop? Read the guide by the FPS Economy with tips to open your shop safely. This guide also contains information for market vendors, hairdressers, beauticians and shopping centres.

Do you have a question about employment?

Social contact

  • You are not allowed outside in groups.
  • You are only allowed outside with
    • the people living with you in the same household
    • an extra 2 other people. Always keep a distance of 1.5 metres.
  • You are allowed to receive visits from up to four people.
    • These must always be the same people.
    • These can be single people or people who live together (e.g. a family). Together you form a new group.
    • Your group is not allowed to visit other people or receive visits from other people. You are allowed to meet up separately. You must clearly agree that you are only meeting with each other

Do you have a question about social contact ?

Sports and culture

  • Exercise is good for you.
  • You are allowed to exercise
    • outside
    • at a distance of 1.5 metres from other people
    • alone, together with your family or with a maximum of 2 friends
  • Are you training with a coach or coaching assistant of a sports club? A maximum of 20 people are allowed to train together. Always keep a distance of 1.5 metres from each other. The cafeteria and changing rooms remain closed.

Culture

  • Theatre, cinema and concert halls are closed.
  • All types of events are prohibited until 30 June.
    • Sports competitions are prohibited until 31 July.
    • Mass events (e.g. festivals) are prohibited until 31 August.
  • What is open ?
    • Museums and historic buildings
    • Nature and animal parks
    • Libraries. In some libraries you can only reserve and pick up books.
  • Youth camps can accommodate bubbles consisting of a maximum of 50 people.

Do you have a question about sports or culture?

Nurseries and schools

  • Nurseries are open. Your nursery will contact you with more information.
  • Schools provide care for the children of people who have to go into work and are not working from home.
  • Some children in primary and secondary education are allowed to go back to school.

Do you have a question about nurseries or schools?

Frequently asked questions

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General measures

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  • What can I do myself?
    • The basic hygiene measures remain essential;
    • Staying at home remains the norm;
    • Only authorised travel (commuting to work when teleworking is impossible, going to the pharmacist, going to the post office, buying food, refuelling, etc.) is allowed;
    • Social contacts must be limited as much as possible. Specifically, a mix of different ages must be avoided; as must a mix of different social groups that previously did not come into contact with each other. When contact cannot be avoided, the social distancing measures must be respected as much as possible. In situations where this cannot be guaranteed, other appropriate measures must be applied (wearing a face mask, etc.).
    • The social distancing rules do not apply to persons living under the same roof and to children among each other up to the age of 12.

    The new measures will apply from 30 May 2020. All of the measures will apply until 7 June 2020 with the exception of:

    • Non-essential journeys to and from Belgium are prohibited up to and including 8 June 2020;
    • School trips of more than one day are prohibited up to and including 30 June 2020;
    • No professional or amateur sports competitions will take place up to and including 31 July 2020.
    • Events of a cultural, social, festive, folkloric, sporting, tourist and recreational nature are prohibited up to and including 30 June 2020.

    The situation will be evaluated at regular intervals. On the basis of this evaluation, the measures may be relaxed or tightened.

  • When can I go outside?

    Members of the public must stay at home in order to avoid contact with people other than their family members, as much as possible. Only essential journeys are allowed: The following are considered essential journeys:

    1. professional travel (including commuting and the journeys of volunteers in the context of their activities for crucial sectors and essential services);
    2. Necessary travel (doctor’s visit, shopping, travel to the post office, bank, pharmacy, petrol station or assistance to persons in need, parents travelling to their children’s crèche, all travel in the context of a legal obligation, charging a budget meter, driving lessons etc.);
    3. walks and physical activities (including motorbike rides) in the open air that do not involve physical contact provided that they:
    • are carried out alone;
    • are carried out in the company of persons living under the same roof, which also includes residential groups and their supervisors from youth facilities staying under the same roof;
    • and/or in the company of a maximum of two other persons, who are always the same two persons, at a distance of 1.5 metres between each person;

    These activities are permitted for the time necessary to do them. Once these activities are completed, it is compulsory to return home. To avoid gatherings, it is not allowed to sit in parks. Tolerance must be shown towards pregnant women and the elderly. This measure does not have to be strictly applied either to people with reduced mobility or mental disabilities. For the same reasons, picnics and sunbathing are not allowed in parks either. The use of a motorised vehicle to carry out a physical activity or walk is only allowed to travel to the destination (e.g. a forest at a reasonable distance) or the necessary sports infrastructure of the sport or walk in question. Moreover, it is reiterated that tourist activities or excursions are not allowed.

    1. Visit to one other household within the restrictions allowed under the “social contacts” section of this chapter;
    2. Visits to nature and/or cultural sightseeing;
    3. Journey to a regular training course outdoors in an organised capacity;
    4. Travel to and from a second home;
    5. Moving to and from an outdoor playground;
    6. All other movements explicitly referred to in these FAQs.
  • What are the consequences of non-compliance with the measures decided at the federal level?
    Compliance with the announced measures is essential in order to avoid an uncontrolled resurgence of the epidemic and delayed phases of the scaling back strategy. We are counting on everyone’s sense of civic duty and responsibility. In the event of non-compliance with the measures (provided by the Ministerial Order), sanctions are possible under Article 187 of the law on Civil Security of 15 May 2007, among others. Local authorities remain competent for public order in accordance with article 135 §2 of the new municipal law, without prejudice to the measures or the spirit of the measures taken at a higher level. The police forces will carry out permanent checks to ensure strict compliance with the measures.
  • Who can I invite/visit?

    From Sunday 10 May, limited social contacts are possible under strict conditions. In order to prevent the spread of the virus, it is important to limit these social contacts and to take into account the following rules:

    • A household (i.e. persons living under the same roof and regardless of the number) may receive visits from no more than four people from Sunday 10 May onwards.
    • These must always be the same four people, and may or may not be part of the same household. These people must form a social bubble.
    • The four persons are chosen as a household and not as individuals. For example, if the whole household chooses to visit their 4 grandparents, they cannot invite their friends.
    • When a person from one household is invited to another person’s home, his/her entire household commits itself, even if this person is the only one visiting. For example, it is therefore not possible to meet with one’s parents one day and four other people the next.
    • The necessary physical distance (1.5 meters) must always be respected between people from different households. The visit should preferably take place outside (for example on a terrace or in the garden).
    • The visit cannot take place if any of these people are sick.
    • In the context of limited social contacts, it is permitted to travel within Belgium. This is not supposed to be a (tourist) day trip.

    In the context of limited social contact, it is permitted to travel to visit a different household. This is not supposed to be a (tourist) day trip.

    It is everyone’s responsibility to diligently apply these limited social contacts.

  • I live alone. Who can I invite or visit?
    As a single person, you can invite four other single persons (or for example 2 couples without children or a family of 4). These persons must undertake to only see each other. These people therefore form a new social bubble. It is therefore not possible to meet one day with this bubble, and another day with people from another bubble. The social bubble must not always meet up at the same time, but it must always be limited to the persons from the same social bubble. It is therefore possible to meet up with two people from this social bubble. The most important thing is that everyone in this social bubble limits their contacts to these people. The necessary physical distance (1.5 metres) must always be respected between people from a different household. If you have a terrace or garden, it is best to meet up outside. Of course, it is not possible to visit if one of these people is ill.
  • If the chosen social bubble contains grandparents, may they look after the grandchildren?
    Yes, if they are not part of an at-risk group (65+, poor health, etc.).
  • Are the two people I am going to exercise with part of my social bubble?
    These persons do not count in the social bubble of the household. For example, it is therefore possible to go for a walk with two people, who are always the same (with respect for the physical distance) and receive a visit at home from four other people, but always the same people.
  • Is the government using my personal telecoms data in the fight against the coronavirus?
    No, the government only has access to anonymous data, and carries out analyses that help in the fight against the coronavirus on the basis of this data. The government does not process any address, telephone number or name. It is ensured that the data cannot in any way be traced back to an individual. At the level of aggregation used, members of the public are completely anonymous and their identity is protected.
  • Why are telecoms data used?
    The government uses the anonymised and aggregated telecoms data to help make decisions regarding the control of the epidemic. Using this data, the government can ascertain various useful elements, such as: has the mobility of Belgians decreased since the measures were adopted by the National Security Council? In which geographical areas is mobility higher than in others?
  • Does this mean that all my movements are now being monitored?
    No, no new data is being collected in the context of these analyses. The data does not leave the premises of the telecoms operators. They are anonymised (i.e., it is not possible to know which individual is behind which data point) and aggregated (i.e., there is no analysis of a single individual’s behaviour).
  • Will my data be stored or reused?
    No, the data processed in the context of this project are only being used to tackle the Covid-19 epidemic. Irrelevant data is immediately and continuously deleted. Once the corona crisis is over, all data will be deleted so that they can never be stolen or used against members of the public.
  • Why is it relevant to use telecoms data in the context of a Covid-19 epidemic?
    Using mobile phone data (aggregated and anonymised) to manage epidemiological crises has already been done and has proven its effectiveness. For example, technologies similar to those currently being used were implemented during the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2013-2015. The Covid-19 virus is transmitted due to physical proximity between individuals. As such, the use of data regarding population movements can provide health authorities with essential information for managing the epidemic.
  • Can this data be used against me?
    Absolutely not. The data processed are completely anonymous and cannot be traced back to individuals. Analyses are only carried out to inform policymakers and the public. Under no circumstances will the data be used for repressive or punitive ends against individual members of the public.
  • Are there similar initiatives in other European countries?
    Yes, governments and mobile operators in other European countries, as well as the European Commission, are working on similar initiatives. The Belgian government is in contact with some of these countries to share expertise and, to the extent possible, also measure cross-border movements.
  • Do these practices comply with national and European privacy regulations?
    Absolutely. In Belgium, special attention is given to scrupulously respecting privacy regulations, unlike in some other regions of the world. The government’s approach is “privacy first”. Not only is compliance with applicable legislation continually monitored, data privacy experts and an ethics committee are also involved in analysing the data. The approach and working methods have been approved by the Data Protection Authority.
  • Who analyses and uses the data?
    The government decides which analyses will be applied to the anonymised and aggregated data, and for which purposes these analyses can be used. This is in close consultation with the Data Protection Authority. The telecoms operators only supply anonymised and aggregated data to Sciensano, which then sends the requested analyses to the government.
  • Can I choose not to provide location data in the context of the 'data against Corona' project?
    No, your location data are not supplied individually. The government only receives an overview of anonymised and aggregated data. This is never individually traceable and completely anonymous. This supply of data has been coordinated with the Data Protection Authority.

Work & economy

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  • Which shops can stay open?

    All businesses selling goods or services to consumers may open to the public, with the exception of:

    • massage parlours;
    • wellness centres, including saunas;
    • fitness centres;
    • Casinos, fruit machine halls and bookmakers.

    For the above-listed companies, home services are not permitted either.

    Tips for the reopening of businesses: https://economie.fgov.be/nl/publicaties/coronavirus-gids-voor-de

  • What are the specific measures for shops that remain open?

    Businesses selling goods or services to consumers which can open to the public may do so, under certain conditions:

    • Admitting customers in accordance with these terms:
    • 1 customer per 10m² can be admitted for a maximum period of 30 minutes, with the exception of shops with a surface area of less than 20m². For these businesses, it is possible to admit 2 customers provided that a distance of 1.5 metres between each person is guaranteed;
    • As regards shops or businesses that work by appointment (e.g. lawyers, notaries, interior designers, jewellers, kitchen sellers), these can admit customers for as long as they usually do and without limitation of the number of persons;
    • The company must provide staff and customers with the means to ensure the necessary hand hygiene;
    • Other measures aimed customers can be found in the “Generic guide on the opening of businesses to prevent the spread of COVID-19” available on the website of the Federal Public Service Economy.
    • Companies can follow the instructions set out in the ‘Generic guide for combatting the spread of COVID-19 at work’. Employers must inform workers in good time regarding the prevention measures in force and provide appropriate training.

    A number of specific conditions apply to shopping centres:

    • One customer per 10m² is admitted for a period not longer than necessary and usual;
    • Means to ensure necessary hand hygiene must be made available at the entrance and exit;
    • Markers to indicate 1.5 metres distance must be applied to the floor and/or with signs.

    The rules imposed on shops also apply to shops located in a shopping centre, in particular the time limit on shopping (30min).

  • Can companies propose home services for customers?

    Companies may propose home services for customers with the exception of masseurs/masseuses.

    All other home services may be provided, such as domestic help, window cleaning, chimney sweeping, technical inspections of installations, house visits by estate agents, inspections by the municipal land department, preparation of an EPC certificate and private music lessons. The companies offering these services must respect the social distancing measures applicable in their sector.

    As regards beauty specialists, specialist chiropodists, non-medical pedicure providers, manicure providers, hairdressers and barbers, tattoo artists and piercing providers, they must respect the following conditions in order to provide these services at home:

    • the service provider may only be present for the time strictly necessary;
    • Wearing a face mask (or any fabric alternative) is mandatory for both the service provider and any customers over the age of 12. The customer’s mask may only be removed for a specific facial treatment and only for the time strictly necessary for this treatment;
    • The service provider will take appropriate the hygiene measures to disinfect their hands, the instruments used and their workstation between each customer.

    As regards construction works and repairs indoors:

    • Urgent repairs must be performed in a manner that ensures compliance with social distancing measures as much as possible or other appropriate measures that provide at least an equivalent level of protection;
    • A non-urgent repair or rebuilding work must be performed in a manner that ensures compliance with social distancing measures as much as possible.
  • What rules are there for customers?

    Several restrictions also apply to customers:

    • Shopping must be done alone except where an appointment has been made. An exception can be made for an adult accompanying minors living under the same roof or a person in need of an escort;
    • Shopping is allowed for a maximum period of 30 minutes per shop except where an appointment has been made;
    • People are strongly advised to wear nose and mouth protection.

    It is also advisable to visit shops that are located in a city or municipality near your home or workplace. It is recommended that priority be given to older people, people with reduced mobility and care staff.

  • What rules are there for close-contact professions (beauty salons, specialist pedicure clinics, non-medical pedicure businesses, nail salons, hairdressers and barbers, tattoo and piercing salons)?

    For these companies, the following stipulations will apply:

    • 1 customer per 10m² can be admitted, with the exception of shops with a surface area of less than 20m². For these businesses, it is possible to admit 2 customers provided that a distance of 1.5 metres between each person is guaranteed;
    • The admission may only take place by appointment for the duration that is strictly necessary;
    • Customers will wait outside the premises and may not use the waiting areas.
    • Customers will have no access to the toilets (except in emergencies);
    • No drinks or snacks will be served;
    • A distance of 1.5 metres should be maintained between each workstation. Where possible, staff will not work on the same side;
    • The service provider will take appropriate the hygiene measures to disinfect their hands, the instruments used and their workstation between each customer;
    • Wearing a face mask or any fabric alternative on the premises will be mandatory for the staff and for consumers over the age of 12. The customer’s mask may only be removed by the customer for a specific facial treatment and only for the time strictly necessary for this treatment.
    • Hand sanitising gel will be available at the entrance to the premises and in various other places.

    Hair salons can only admit one customer per 10m² in principle. Because hairdressers organise their service provision in various stages (e.g. permanent hair dyeing), during which each customer has an individual place, a certain flexibility can be afforded to hairdressers with regard to the number of customers permitted in line with the salon’s surface area. In order to deviate from this rule, however, the workstations must be partitioned off from one another with a plexiglass wall or an equivalent alternative.

    Other measures aimed customers can be found in the “Generic guide on the opening of businesses to prevent the spread of COVID-19” available on the website of the Federal Public Service Economy.

    The aforementioned companies can follow the instructions set out in the ‘Generic guide for combatting the spread of COVID-19 at work’. Employers must inform workers in good time regarding the prevention measures in force and provide appropriate training.

    Where this work is carried out at home, the service provider may only be present for the time that is strictly necessary. Wearing a face mask or any other fabric alternative is mandatory for both the service provider and any customers over the age of 12. The customer’s mask may only be removed for a specific facial treatment and only for the time strictly necessary for this treatment. The service provider will take appropriate the hygiene measures to disinfect their hands, the instruments used and their workstation between each customer.

  • Who is responsible for monitoring compliance in shops?
    It is the responsibility of the owner of the shop to enforce the social distancing measures. The owner must take the appropriate measures to ensure compliance. If they rely on a security firm, this must be in accordance with the law of 2 October 2017 regulating private and special security.
  • Are there any restrictions on opening hours for shops?
    Shops can remain open during their normal opening hours and days. Night shops may be open between their usual opening hours and 10.00pm.
  • Can an obligation be imposed to keep shops open?
    If public order or the general interest so requires, the mayor can order the necessary police measures, including the opening of businesses.
  • How should I clean and disinfect my retail space?
    Any common cleaning agent can be used to clean work surfaces, floors, walls, etc. The user instructions must be followed rigorously and always ensure to rinse thoroughly with potable water. Only authorised biocides may be used to disinfect the rooms in your company. The conditions of use on the label and stipulated in the authorisation document must be strictly adhered to. For example, it may be necessary to protect or remove foodstuffs from the treated area or to thoroughly rinse the treated surfaces with potable water. It is prohibited to spray biocides onto fruit and vegetables with a view to ‘disinfect’ them. Biocides can be harmful to human health. You can consult the list of authorised biocides and their specific conditions of use via the following link: https://www.health.belgium.be/en/list-authorised-biocides-and-annual-report.
  • Do we need to build up a food supply?
    This is unnecessary. Food stores continue to be stocked in a normal way and remain open as usual.
  • Are volunteers allowed to offer their services to companies in crucial sectors?

    According to the Volunteer Act of 3 July 2005, volunteers can in principle only be deployed by organisations that pursue a not-for-profit objective. The Volunteer Act does not allow volunteer work for commercial enterprises in principle.

    The scope of the Act of 3 July 2005 has been widened to include organisations that are recognised by the competent authorities as regards assistance and care for the elderly or relief and accommodation for the elderly on the one hand, and those belonging to the private commercial sector on the other, for the period between 1 May 2020 and 30 June 2020.

    Journeys made by volunteers to an organisation that falls under a crucial sector or essential service are allowed, including commuting to and from the activity.

  • What about the catering sector (horeca)?

    Establishments in the catering sector are closed to the public.

    As regards restaurants, only meal deliveries and take-away meals are allowed during the usual opening hours. If customers have to wait outside, the social distancing measures must be respected. Terrace furniture must be brought inside and may not be used. Hotels and aparthotels may remain open with the exception of their restaurants, bars, dining areas, meeting rooms and other common areas. Terrace furniture must be brought inside and may not be used.

    As regards food trucks, chicken stalls, ice cream stands, etc., an individual itinerant activity may be exercised at the usual location (or the usual route) subject to prior permission from the municipal authorities or as part of a permitted market (see conditions in the itinerant activities section).

  • What are the rules for other types of homes?

    Hotels and aparthotels are allowed to stay open but without access to the bar, the restaurants (communal areas) and recreational areas, in order to meet the demand for accommodation for essential journeys. However, room service is permitted. Terrace furniture must be brought inside.

    The meeting rooms of these hotels are closed. Recreational and tourist residences (e.g. cottages, camp sites, B&B, holiday parks and Airbnb) have to close with the exception of second homes. The permanent residents, owners and long-term tenant(s) (minimum 1 year), of this type of accommodation may, of course, continue to live here. This also applies to permanent residents of a mobile caravan. The following are considered permanent residents of this type of dwelling:

    1. People who are formally registered in the holiday or weekend residence (regardless of whether they have a right of residence in the weekend or holiday residence), where they are found.
    2. People who have a reference address and are not legally registered anywhere else (caravan dwellers, people without their own home due to lack of sufficient means of subsistence).
    3. Belgians who legally reside abroad, returned to Belgium, but are not (yet) registered anywhere and are currently dependent on a mobile home or caravan.
    4. Foreign nationals who, prior to the entry into force of the measures, were staying in a recreational area and are demonstrably unable to return to their country, to the extent and for as long as this impossibility lasts. They remain obliged to return as soon as possible to their country of legal residence and/or to the country of their nationality.
  • Various holiday parks and cottages are being used as permanent accommodation for employees of utility companies for essential services (offshore wind farms, Doel, Tihange, etc.). Can an exception be made in this regard?
    Residents who have their permanent home there are allowed to stay.
  • What about caravan sites?
    Permanent residents are allowed to stay. However, travelling to another site is not an essential journey, so we advise the mayor to take the necessary steps to facilitate the stay of these people until the end of the crisis.
  • Can I still order parcels online?
    Yes, online shops remain open and can continue to deliver. The delivery of your parcel is contactless.
  • Can home delivery services (Bpost, DHL, etc.) continue to work?
    Yes, in fact this is encouraged, subject to social distancing measures. Collections from official pick-up points are permitted.
  • Is my local market and other itinerant activitiets open?

    An individual itinerant activity (both food and non-food related) may be exercised at the usual location (or on the usual route) subject to prior permission from the municipal authorities. As regards markets:

    • All markets with more than 50 stalls are prohibited.
    • Markets with 50 or fewer stalls, which are organised on a regular basis (daily, weekly, fortnightly), can take place, subject to prior permission from the local authorities.

    The necessary measures must be taken at all markets permitted by the local authorities to protect everyone from the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, including the application of the social distancing rules, in particular maintaining a distance of 1.5 metres between each person. Where the local authorities do permit a market, they will establish the conditions for this. Appropriate and timely preventative measures will be taken, as recommended in the “General guide for re-opening shops to combat the spread of the COVID-19 virus”, which is available on the FPS Economy’s website.

    Each market must satisfy the following conditions:

    • The conditions determined by the local authorities
    • The social distancing rules are being respected.
    • The maximum number of visitors permitted at the market is one per 1.5 running metres at the stall.
    • This does not involve antique markets or jumble sales.
    • Because the wares are situated between the market vendor and the customer, wearing a face mask is mandatory for market vendors and their staff to avoid infection via droplets and aerosol particles. For customers, wearing a face mask is highly recommended.
    • Means for guaranteeing the necessary hand hygiene must be made available at the entrance and exit of the market by the competent municipal authorities. The market vendors will also make hand gels available.
    • Food and drink cannot be consumed at the market. No food or drink will be offered to customers for tasting.
    • An organisation or system will be introduced to check how many customers are present at the market.
    • A one-way traffic plan will be drawn up, with separate entrances and exits for the market, unless a justified deviation from this is permitted by the local authorities in exceptional circumstances that provides for an alternative solution.
    • Shopping must be done alone. An exception can be made for an adult accompanying minors living under the same roof or a person in need of an escort;
    • No more time will be taken than is necessary and usual to do the shopping.
  • Can tanning centres open?
    Tanning centres can open. The hygienic measures prescribe the use of individual cabins, with only 1 person per cabin, which must be disinfected after use.
  • Can companies offering massage services (therapeutic massages, shiatsu, sports massages, reflexology, etc.) open?

    No, these may not yet open as part of phase 2, as with the previous phase of scaling back the measures. At the experts’ request, the prohibition on opening massage parlours will continue to be maintained during this phase of the scale-back. Massage still constitutes too great a sanitary risk at this time.

    For these companies, as announced following the National Security Council meeting on 6 May, there will be consultation with the sector in order to determine when and under what conditions they can be opened.

  • Is it allowed to move house, with or without removals companies?
    All house removals are allowed.
  • Can wholesale markets (for professional customers) continue to operate (Brussels wholesale market, Zeebrugge fish market, etc.)?
    Yes, if the social distancing measures are applied as much as possible.
  • What about infection through packaging and food?
    The website of the FASFC contains information to clarify matters for consumers and operators in the food chain (Dutch or French only). http://www.favv-afsca.fgov.be/professionelen/publicaties/mededelingen/coronavirus.asp
  • What are the general principles for companies?

    Teleworking is encouraged in all companies for all staff whose position is suitable for it. Where teleworking is not applied, companies must take the appropriate measures:

    • ensuring maximum compliance with the social distancing rules, and in particular that a distance of 1.5m is maintained between each person.
    • if the social distancing rules cannot be guaranteed, ensuring at least an equivalent level of protection. The above measures shall also be applied in the case of transport organised by the employer.

    The application of these principles must be guaranteed at company level and developed by taking preventative measures as defined in the “Generic guide for combatting the spread of COVID-19 at work” (available at: https://employment.belgium.be/sites/default/files/content/documents/Coronavirus/Genericguide.pdf); possibly supplemented by:

    • guidelines at sectoral level;
    • and/or guidelines at company level; and/or other appropriate measures offering at least an equivalent level of protection. Collective measures always take precedence over individual measures.

    For companies that do belong to the crucial sectors and essential services:

    However, these companies and services are obliged to apply, to the extent possible, the system of teleworking and the rules of social distancing. Sectors and employers belonging to crucial sectors and essential services who have not interrupted their activities and who have already taken the necessary safety measures themselves can use the generic guide above as a source of inspiration. As regards subcontracting and ancillary services of crucial sectors and essential services, they are subject to the regulations applicable to the crucial sectors and essential services.

    More information: https://economie.fgov.be/nl/themas/ondernemingen/coronavirus/coronavirus-informatie-voor

  • Apart from employees, who is allowed to be present on company premises?
    At publicly accessible places within companies which do not fall under the essential services and crucial sectors, the public may be granted access subject to social distancing measures or an equivalent level of protection applicable within the companies. At publicly accessible places which do fall under the essential services and crucial sectors, public access will be organised such that the social distancing rules are applied insofar as possible.

Health

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  • What are the recommendations for wearing face masks and gloves in public places?

    COVID-19 is transmitted via droplets and contact with infected surfaces, not by air. Wearing a face mask therefore offers no protection against infection if someone does not have close contact (within a distance of 1.5 metres) with a sick person. Covering the face and nose is important during the scaling-back period. This can be done with a so-called comfort mask or an alternative means of protection such as a scarf or bandana. This is:

    • Highly recommended in public spaces, in shops and at markets for customers;
    • Mandatory on public transport from entering the airport, the station, on the platform or a bus, (pre-)metro, tram, train stop or any other means of transport organised by a public authority for users aged 12 and over. Public transport drivers are not required to cover their nose and mouth, insofar as the driver is well-isolated in a cabin on the one hand, and a poster and/or sticker indicates to users the reason why the driver is not wearing a mask on the other;
    • Mandatory for public transport drivers unless they are in a sealed cabin;
    • Highly recommended for primary and secondary school staff;
    • Highly recommended for secondary school pupils;
    • Mandatory for market vendors and their staff;
    • Mandatory for close-contact professions and their customers aged 12 and over. The customer’s mask may only be removed for a specific facial treatment and only for the time strictly necessary for this treatment.

    In itself, a mask does not provide adequate protection, it must be seen within the wider use of face masks, hygiene measures and physical distancing. For more information about fabric face masks, please visit:

    https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/facemask/

    However, wearing gloves is not recommended, as it gives a false sense of security, people still touch their nose, mouth and eyes if they are wearing gloves, whereby they can still get infected. It is much better to regularly wash hands with soap and water.

  • Are special measures taken in hospitals?

    Despite the general measures on social distancing, care for people remains a priority and must be ensured.

    In recent weeks, the epidemic has had a significant impact on healthcare provision, both in primary care and in hospitals. Working groups are currently studying how to respond to the need to continue providing the best care to people infected with COVID-19 while gradually and safely increasing access to general and specialised healthcare. The aim is to ensure that everyone regains ‘normal’ access to healthcare as soon as possible and that the medical infrastructure needed to care for people suffering from the virus is not overloaded. It is advisable to inquire at the care facilities and follow their guidelines.

    As from 04/05/2020, care providers active in ambulatory care may perform their activities for both urgent and non-urgent care provided that they respect the recommendations as set out at https://www.health.belgium.be/nl/covid-19-heropstarten-van-ambulante-zorgverstrekking-een-prive-praktijk.

    Care providers working in hospitals may also perform urgent and non-urgent services in accordance with the guidelines on the VBS-GBS website: www.vbs-gbs.org and the FPS Public health. Blood collections must continue, with respect for social distancing measures as much as possible. Persons who are ill must, as always, be excluded.

  • Are visitors allowed in hospitals?
    From 2 June 2020, hospitals will have individual arrangements for visitors that ensure the safety of patients, staff and visitors. Therapeutic leave for children and adolescents under the age of 18 is authorised for all hospitals, with the hospital providing an arrangement that ensures the safety of other patients and staff. For psychiatric hospitals, the arrangements for visitors from 11 May 2020 remain in force. It is specified that the terms for family visits apply to all patients. Patients and visitors are advised to contact their hospital to find out what the exact terms of a visit are.
  • Are visits allowed in residential care centres or residential care institutions?
    Remote communication (by phone, video call, etc.) is recommended, for hygienic reasons. Essential visits (informal caregivers, etc.) are allowed, so that residents are not in total isolation. Consult the residential care centre or institution to determine whether a visit is possible in a safe manner. A chat room that separates visitors and residents via a large glass panel may be installed, provided it is disinfected after each visit.
  • Are home and family support services allowed to continue?

    Support (including volunteers) to older persons, disabled persons and vulnerable persons can be continued. This includes:

    • Home help
    • Family help
    • Assistance to disabled persons
    • Home nursing
    • Reception shelters for abused women
    • Reception centres and night shelters for people with social problems and the homeless.
  • Who is currently being tested?

    Detailed information concerning the procedure for general practitioners can be found on the Sciensano website: https://epidemio.wiv-isp.be/ID/Pages/2019-nCoV_procedures.aspx.

    More information: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/testing/

  • Can health workers continue to work when they show symptoms?

    Healthcare workers can continue to work if they show mild symptoms, provided they use a protective mouth mask. In case of fever, ≥ 37.5°C, they cannot continue to work and should stay at home.

    More information:

  • Can ambulance workers continue to work if they show symptoms?
    Ambulance workers can continue to work if they show mild symptoms, provided they use a protective mouth mask. In case of fever, ≥ 37.5°C, they can no longer work and should stay at home.
  • All emergency services belong to a risk group in terms of infection by COVID-19. Will there be automatic recognition as a workplace accident/occupational disease if they appear to be infected with COVID-19?
    Infection by the novel COVID-19 can be recognised as an occupational disease (see (Dutch and French only) https://fedris.be/nl/news#news-2696). However, claims for compensation must be accompanied by the results of a laboratory test confirming the presence of COVID-19.
  • Are service flats regarded as residential care centres?
    Yes, service flats must be regarded as residential care centres if they have a communal entrance.
  • Questions about contact tracing?
    On the Sciensano website you will find an extensive list of questions and answers (in Dutch) : https://covid-19.sciensano.be/sites/default/files/Covid19/COVID-19_FAQ%20contact%20tracing_NL.pdf

Education

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  • Do schools remain open?

    Lessons can be gradually resumed at school, provided that the schools closely observe the following protocols:

    • Hygiene rules (washing hands, etc.) remain essential for everyone;
    • Classes, corridors and teachers’ rooms must be well ventilated at all times;
    • Classes and other activities should ideally be held outdoors;
    • Schools must have a contingency plan in place in case an outbreak occurs.

    Furthermore, there are specific arrangements for each level of education.

  • What rules apply for pre-school education?

    All classes in pre-school education can be resumed under the following conditions:

    • Infants at nursery schools do not have to wear a face mask. For educational and social reasons, it is not advisable for teachers to wear a mask when teaching these very young children;
    • Nose and mouth protection for staff is strongly recommended for any contact with other adults (colleagues, parents, etc.);
    • Respecting social distancing is not required here.
  • What rules apply for primary education?

    Until 08/06/2020:

    Classes and activities will resume for certain pupils in primary education under strict organisational conditions. The staff and pupils from the age of 12 and over are required to cover their mouth and nose with a mask or any other alternative. For those school years for which classes are not yet being resumed, childcare will be provided for children whose parents:

    • work in health care and/or the assistance sector;
    • work in an essential public sector;
    • have no option but to have their children looked after by a grandparent who is part of an at-risk group (65+, poor health, etc.).

    The schools may make new pedagogical materials available to pupils at home and can individually invite pupils who need to be subject to specific monitoring owing to problems at school or special educational needs. Travel in this context is permitted.

    From 08/06/2020 (or from 05/06/2020 if a pilot project is organised):

    Classes for all years in primary education can be resumed from 8 June under the following conditions:

    • Pupils in primary schools do not have to wear a face mask. For staff, wearing a mask or any other safe alternative is strongly recommended if social distancing cannot be guaranteed;

    • For primary school pupils, the social distancing rules can be relaxed. Nonetheless, these rules remain applicable between:

    • students and teachers;

    • teachers among themselves;

    • teachers and parents.

    • During playtime, children should play as much as possible within their own class group, according to the principle of ‘contact bubbles’.

  • What rules apply for secondary education?
    Classes and activities will resume for certain pupils in secondary education under strict organisational conditions. It is strongly recommended for both staff and all students to cover their mouth and nose with a mask or a safe alternative. In secondary education, pupils are allowed not to wear face masks temporarily, on account of a medical condition, for example, or during break times and sports activities. The schools may make new pedagogical materials available to pupils at home and can individually invite pupils who need to be subject to specific monitoring owing to problems at school or special educational needs. Travel in this context is permitted.
  • What rules apply in higher education?
    Universities and colleges will primarily teach classes remotely. They can however resume their classes and activities in accordance with the guidelines from the Communities and the additional measures from the federal government. Internships will be resumed in line with the pace at which the sectors concerned are restarting.
  • What rules apply in adult education?
    Adult education institutions (including informal adult education) may resume their classes and activities in accordance with the guidelines from the Communities and the additional measures provided by the federal government. The Communities may decide to resume part-time arts education for limited activities, but only where the infrastructure configuration permits this.
  • Will crèches and child minders remain open?
  • How can child minders apply social distancing?
    The necessary hygienic measures have to be followed but social distancing is difficult with regard to children. Social distancing measures do however have to be strictly observed by parents. It is true that groups of children from the same crèche are often seen as belonging to the same social group.
  • What about children of (possibly) infected parents?
    Children of parents infected with Covid-19 cannot attend school or childcare for 14 days. Sciensano has developed a procedure relating to the COVID-19 measures for children in residential settings, which is available on the following website: https://covid-19.sciensano.be/sites/default/files/Covid19/COVID-19_procedure_children_NL.pdf
  • What about university students' exams?
    Exams can be organised. The websites of the educational institutions concerned can be consulted in this regard. “Silent places” for students without appropriate study facilities can be organised by appointment and subject to social distancing measures. If these places are in public libraries, as is the case in various faculties, supervisory control for students by supervisors and staff must be envisaged.
  • What about education and training for security professions?
    Schools for security professions continue primary education through remote classes, or help the crisis effort by providing training-on-the-job.
  • Can professional training be resumed?
    This training can be resumed if it complies with the social distancing rules applicable at the company.
  • May boarding schools, shelters and permanent shelters and special needs schools reopen?
    These institutions will remain open. Particular organisational stipulations may be provided for these institutions.
  • May training offered by PCSWs (e.g. group training on handling a limited budget) be resumed?
    This training can be resumed if it complies with the social distancing rules for the local government.
  • May training in the context of evening classes (e.g. cooking lessons and language classes) resume?
    Adult education institutions may resume their classes and activities in accordance with the guidelines from the Communities and the additional measures from the federal government.

Public services & leisure

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  • What about public administrations (e.g. municipalities)?

    Administrations continue to function in order to guarantee their services, subject to social distancing measures and/or teleworking where possible. They will inform the public about the possibilities of obtaining documents and information via alternative channels (online).

    More information:

  • Is door-to-door collection of household waste allowed to continue?

    The various waste collections (residual waste, green waste, paper, glass, cardboard and PMD) are guaranteed, at least if there is sufficient collection staff. Otherwise, priority will be given to the collection of residual waste and organic waste (with the exception of green waste). The regulations on the collection of household and similar commercial waste can be found on the websites of the regions concerned.

    The rules for Flanders can be found at: https://ovam.be/corona-impact#inzameling and https://www.arp-gan.be/en/

  • Are container parks closed?

    The rules for container parks can be found on the websites of the regions concerned.

  • Can I still go to the library?
    Libraries are considered a public service and are publicly accessible with free entry and exit for basic service provision (lending and returning). The social distancing measures must be respected. The governors must ensure that free public access is organised. “Silent places” for students without appropriate study facilities can be organised in the library by appointment and subject to social distancing measures.
  • Do regional, provincial and municipal domains, parks and woodland have to be closed?

    Parks and woodland, as well as cultural and natural sites, can open, subject to social distancing measures. Walks and physical activities in the open air that do not involve physical contact are allowed, provided that they:

    1. are carried out alone;
    2. are carried out in the company of persons living under the same roof, which also includes residential groups and their supervisors from youth facilities staying under the same roof;
    3. and/or are carried out in the company of a maximum of two other persons, who are always the same two persons, at a distance of 1.5 metres between each person.

    The municipal, provincial and regional authorities organise the supervision of the playgrounds they deem necessary within these areas. The following conditions must be respected: Visits to playgrounds are reserved for children up to 12 years old. Adults supervising children must comply with the social distancing rules, and in particular keeping a distance of 1.5m between each person. In addition, access to large playgrounds in parks must be limited to a maximum of 20 children at a time. These activities are permitted for the time necessary to do them. Once these activities are completed, it is compulsory to return home.

    To avoid gatherings, it is not allowed to sit in parks. Tolerance must be shown towards pregnant women and the elderly. This measure does not have to be strictly applied either to people with reduced mobility or mental disabilities. For the same reasons, picnics and sunbathing are not allowed in parks either.

  • Are there specific provisions for public toilets and hygiene?
    For reasons of public order and hygiene, it is recommended to these open or provide an alternative. The municipality must take the necessary hygienic measures in this regard.
  • May associations organise waste collections (waste paper) for charity?
    Yes, in municipalities where there is no alternative and/or this way of working is prevalent, this is permitted, but the social distancing measures must be respected as far as possible.
  • Will call centres for people in need (suicide, domestic violence, etc.) remain available?
    Yes, subject to social distancing measures by the call takers. Useful numbers and websites can be found here : https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/psychosocial-care/
  • Can I get evicted?
    The regions have decided to suspend all evictions for the time being.
  • Can people still get together socially?
    No, the rule is still that all gatherings of more than 2 persons are prohibited apart from the exceptions given in this FAQ.
  • Can academies for music, drama and dance, and art academies resume classes?
    Classes may resume in accordance with the guidelines from the Communities and the additional measures provided by the federal government.
  • which recreational and outdoor activities are permitted?

    Private and public activities of a cultural, social, festive, folkloric, sporting, tourist and recreational nature are prohibited. Exceptions are:

    • walks and physical activities (including motorbike rides) in the open air under strict conditions;
    • Sports training outdoors in the open air under strict conditions;
    • Horse riding under strict conditions;
    • Natural and cultural sightseeing under strict conditions;
    • Visits to open-air playgrounds under strict conditions;
    • Marriages, funerals and religious ceremonies under strict conditions.
  • Under what conditions may I go for a walk or undertake physical activity?

    Walks and physical activities (including motorbike rides) in the open air that do not involve physical contact are permitted provided that they:

    • are carried out alone;
    • are carried out in the company of persons living under the same roof, which also includes residential groups and their supervisors from youth facilities staying under the same roof;
    • and/or in the company of a maximum of two other persons, who are always the same two persons, at a distance of 1.5 metres between each person.

    These activities are permitted for the time necessary to do them. Once these activities are completed, it is compulsory to return home. To avoid gatherings, it is not allowed to sit in parks. Tolerance must be shown towards pregnant women and the elderly. This measure does not have to be strictly applied either to people with reduced mobility or mental disabilities. For the same reasons, picnics and sunbathing are not allowed in parks either.

    The use of a motorised vehicle to carry out a physical activity or walk is only allowed to travel to the destination (e.g. a forest at a reasonable distance) or the necessary sports infrastructure of the sport or walk in question. Moreover, it is reiterated that tourist activities or excursions are not allowed.

    Sports training in the open air is also permitted under certain conditions (see “which sports are allowed?” question).

  • Which sports are allowed?

    Physical activities are allowed, on condition that they are carried out:

    • in the open air;
    • without physical contact;

    if they are undertaken:

    • either alone
    • or carried out in the company of persons living under the same roof, which also includes residential groups and their supervisors from youth facilities staying under the same roof and/or in the company of a maximum of two other people, who are always the same people. Social distancing of 1.5 metres must be respected.
    • Either as part of regular training sessions and classes in the open air that do not involve physical contact, in particular where organised by a club or association, with a group of maximum 20 people, always in the presence of a trainer or an adult supervisor, and respecting a 1.5-metre distance between each person;

    The basic principles of social distancing will continue to apply, which is why it is recommended to play sorts with the same group as far as possible. It is not the intention for initiation classes to be organised.

    The necessary and usual facilities for practising the permitted can open, with the exception of changing rooms, showers, canteens and cafeterias. Toilets and vending machines can however be used. Facilities refers to the clubs and sports pitches. The rental or sale of equipment is allowed, while recreational and tourist activities are prohibited.

  • May I accompany my under-age child or a disabled person requiring assistance to a training session and remain there throughout?
    Yes, that is allowed.
  • Do elite athletes get exceptional access to sports facilities?
    Yes, if they have elite sport status and they only do their training in an individual context. Indoor group training sessions are not permitted; the general rules apply for sports in the open air.
  • May fitness centres open?
    Fitness centres may not carry out their activities (indoors or outdoors). However, a coach/trainer associated with a fitness centre may teach classes in the open air in the context of the rule around sports training.
  • Can the municipalities open local (sports) grounds for sporting activities in an organised capacity?
    Yes, as long as a trainer or an adult supervisor is present, and while respecting a 1.5-metre distance between each person.
  • Can I take my child to the playground?

    Yes, the municipal, provincial and regional authorities may decide whether the following playgrounds are accessible:

    • outdoor playgrounds;
    • large playgrounds in parks.

    The municipal, provincial and regional authorities organise the supervision they deem necessary in order to respect the following conditions: Visits to playgrounds are reserved for children up to 12 years old. Adults supervising children must comply with the social distancing rules, and in particular keeping a distance of 1.5m between each person. In addition, access to large playgrounds in parks must be limited to a maximum of 20 children at a time. Playgrounds in natural and cultural sites can be accessible. The operator is responsible for supervision and must prevent any crowds.

  • Can indoor play areas open?
    No
  • Are water sports allowed?
    Yes, as long as the conditions in question “which sports are allowed?” are met.
  • Are drone flights permitted?
    Consult the following website from the FPS Mobility: https://mobilit.belgium.be/nl/luchtvaart/drones/dronevluchten_covid19.
  • Is fishing allowed?
    Yes, but if this is in a club context, only the toilets and vending machines can be accessible, if any.
  • Can hunting continue?

    The regional regulations must be followed here:

  • What are natural sights and under what conditions may they open?

    Natural sights are considered to be: a garden, nature park, nature reserve, zoo or animal park. These may open their doors to the public if the following conditions are respected:

    • Visits are made alone or in the company of people living under the same roof;
    • The social distancing rules, in particular maintaining a minimum 1.5-metre distance between each person, are respected.
    • An online or phone-based ticket system is introduced to regulate the flow of visitors. Payment on-site is possible.
    • One visitor per 10m² of the publicly accessible surface area;
    • A maximum number of visitors per timespan is determined;
    • One-way signage and supervision of the public are provided;
    • The staff are responsible for ensuring that the social distancing rules are complied with;
    • Any shops are required to observe the rules intended for trading businesses;
    • Any cafeterias, restaurants, attractions and playgrounds are closed. With the exception of playgrounds under the supervision of the operator, who must prevent any crowds.

    Day trips will remain prohibited. After the visit, you should immediately return home.

  • May children's farms open?
    Yes, as long as the same rules are followed as for natural sights.
  • May indoor animal parks (aquariums, dolphinariums, reptile houses) open?
    Yes, as long as the same rules are followed as for natural sights. Shows with an audience are not permitted.
  • What are cultural sights and under what conditions may they open?

    Cultural sights are considered to be: museums, historical houses and monuments, citadels and castles. These may re-open if the following conditions are respected:

    • Visits are made alone or with people living under the same roof;
    • An online or phone-based ticket system is introduced to regulate the flow of visitors. Payment on-site is possible.
    • One visitor will be permitted per 15m²;
    • Maximum number of visitors per timespan;
    • One-way signage and supervision of the public are provided;
    • The staff are responsible for ensuring that the social distancing rules are complied with;
    • Any shops are required to observe the rules applicable to trading businesses;
    • Any cafeterias, restaurants, attractions and playgrounds are closed; With the exception of playgrounds under the supervision of the operator, who must prevent any crowds.
    • The didactical materials must be disinfected after each use;

    Day trips will remain prohibited. After the visit, you should immediately return home.

    Cultural centres will remain closed to the public. You can find an overview of the open cultural institutions at:

    Flemish Community: https://www.vlaanderen.be/musea-in-vlaanderen-en-brussel Wallonia-Brussels Federation: www.culture.be German-Speaking Community: https://www.ostbelgienlive.be/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-327/

  • What institutions fall under the definition of a museum?

    A museum is either:

    • A structure recognised as a museum or exhibition space by either the federal government or the federated entities;
    • A permanent institution in the service of society and development, open to the public, that acquires, stores, studies, transfers or exhibits material or immaterial heritage on humanity and its environment for the purposes of study, education or relaxation by means of exhibitions, public activities and scientific communication, which are always carried out by professionals.
  • Are group visits permitted?
    No, group visits are not permitted. Only people living under the same roof may visit a natural or cultural sight together.
  • Are guided visits permitted?
    Yes, these are permitted within natural and cultural sights, but only for people living under the same roof and in accordance with the appropriate social distancing measures for the sight. All other guided visits (e.g. with city guides) are not permitted.
  • May recreational activities and entertainment be organised in the infrastructures of cultural and natural sights?
    No, these will remain prohibited in order to avoid gatherings.
  • May recreational transport be organised within a cultural or natural sight?
    Yes, but only as long as the social distancing measures are guaranteed.
  • May restaurants within the cultural or natural sights open?
    No, only takeaways are permitted.
  • May drink and snack machines be accessible at cultural or natural sights?
    Yes
  • May adventure parks open?
    No, these need to remain closed.
  • May caves open?
    No, these need to remain closed.
  • Are youth movement group activities permitted?
    No.
  • What about prostitution and prostitution neighborhoods?
    Due to the impossibility of respecting social distancing measures, these activities are not authorised.
  • Can I manage environmental and health risks on my site?
    In order to comply with the obligations arising from the management of environmental and health crises, any owner may move about on their property in order to comply with their obligations as regards the control of organisms harmful to plants and plant products, in particular as laid down in the Ordinance of 19/11/1987.
  • Can places of worship remain open to the public despite the fact that services are prohibited?
    Yes, religious buildings and premises remain open, subject to social distancing measures. The managers of these buildings are expected to lay down the necessary rules in this regard, and ensure strict compliance.
  • Can faith-based services continue?

    No, with the exception of:

    • For funeral ceremonies, only in the presence of up to 30 people, maintaining a distance of 1.5 metres between each person and without the possibility of the body being exposed. Organising a light lunch after the ceremony is not permitted.
    • For religious marriages, in the presence of maximum 30 people. Organising a party or reception after the ceremony is not permitted;
    • Religious ceremonies recorded with the intention of broadcasting them via all available channels:
    • which take place with a maximum of 10 people, including the people responsible for the recording;
    • subject to social distancing measures;
    • insofar as the place of worship remains closed to the public during the recording.
  • Are civil marriages still allowed?
    Yes, but only in the presence of a maximum of 30 people who are respecting social distancing. Organising a party or reception after the ceremony is not permitted.
  • What about funerals and cremations?
    Funerals and cremations in the presence of max. 30 people are allowed, subject to social distancing measures and without exposure of the body. Organising a light lunch after the ceremony is not permitted.
  • Are cemeteries allowed to remain open?
    Yes, subject to social distancing measures.
  • Can ashes be scattered at sea?

    Burials at sea, only permitted in the form of scattering the deceased’s ashes from an urn, performed from a ship under the Belgian flag with departure and arrival from a Belgian coastal port, are permitted under the following conditions:

    The following may be on board: the ship’s crew according to the minimum crew requirements and relatives up to a maximum of 30 people provided that the 1.5m distance rule is respected, including during embarkation and disembarkation. The shipping company must take measures to decontaminate the areas used by the family members after sailing. The direct travel from the place of residence of each participating family member to and from the ship are considered as authorised journeys.

  • What is the procedure to follow for the treatment of the corpse of a person who died of Covid-19?
    The FPS Public Health has drawn up a procedure for dealing with the body of a person who died of Covid-19. With respect for the wishes of the family, touching the person(s) deceased by Covid-19 is allowed, but it is crucial to comply with the hygiene measures afterwards.
  • What about special occasions of worship or religious high days?
    The general rules also apply to special occasions or religious high days: religious gatherings cannot take place in places of worship. Family gatherings are limited to persons living in the same dwelling and must take place in that dwelling, possibly in the presence of a maximum of 4 other persons who are part of the same social bubble (for explanations and conditions see the section “Social contacts” under chapter “Public life”).. The specific food shops where extra shopping may be bought in this context can remain open according to the applicable rules for food shops. They must ensure that the rules are applied, in particular where a larger number of customers are expected. The mayor will communicate these measures to the parties in question. The police and the mayor will ensure compliance.
  • My dog or cat is sick, can I still go to the veterinarian?
    Essential care for animals is important and must be guaranteed. The owners of animals are allowed to travel to take care of their animals. More information: http://www.afsca.be/professionelen/publicaties/mededelingen/coronavirus.asp
  • Are animal grooming salons open?
    Yes, if the social distancing measures are applied.
  • Can animal owners continue to visit their animals in a meadow or stable?
    Yes, the essential care of the animal is important and must remain guaranteed, subject to social distancing measures.
  • Can competitions with animals, such as pigeons, still take place?
    No, these are not essential movements.
  • Can I still ride my own horse?

    Horse riding on your own pasture/track is permitted. Horse riding (in the saddle, harnessed, on a tether, etc.) is also permitted under the following strict conditions:

    • As a physical activity in the open air without physical contact, potentially along with people living under the same roof, and/or in the company of a maximum of two other people (riders), who are always the same people.
    • As training or a class with a trainer or an adult supervisor at stables (on an outdoor track or a track exposed to the open air), with a maximum of 20 people (riders).
    • Horse riding with a view to animal welfare, with a maximum of three riders.

    It is permitted to take a trailer with you to travel between your home and the stables or the location of the ride and, if necessary, also to transport the horse. Under-age children or those needing assistance may be accompanied to the activity by their parents or a supervisor, who may remain there. Where this supervisor also takes part in the activity themselves, then they will count towards the permitted number of riders. In all cases, and throughout the duration of the activity or on-site presence, the hygiene and social distancing measures must be strictly observed, so a 1.5-metre distance must always be maintained.

  • May dog schools resume classes?
    Yes, in the context of animal welfare, in the open air, as long as social distancing is maintained between the dogs’ owners.
  • Is pigeon racing permitted?
    Yes, in the context of animal welfare, not as a competition and training is only permitted within Belgium, as long as social distancing is maintained between the owners.
  • Is the sale or rental of real estate without an estate agent permitted?
    Yes, this is permitted in line with the same preventative measures applicable to the real estate sector.

Transport & International

  • driving license driver’s license tires tyre change garage public transport train tram bus metro premetro plane station airport harbor port harbour bike taxi carpool cruise sharing boat sailing boat moving transportation borders abroad
  • May one go somewhere else?

    Members of the public must stay at home in order to avoid contact with people other than their family members, as much as possible. Only essential journeys are allowed: The following are considered essential journeys:

    1. professional travel (including commuting and the journeys of volunteers in the context of their activities for crucial sectors and essential services);
    2. Necessary travel (doctor’s visit, shopping, travel to the post office, bank, pharmacy, petrol station or assistance to persons in need, parents travelling to their children’s crèche, all travel in the context of a legal obligation, charging a budget meter, driving lessons etc.);
    3. walks and physical activities (including motorbike rides) in the open air that do not involve physical contact provided that they:
    • are carried out alone;
    • are carried out in the company of persons living under the same roof, which also includes residential groups and their supervisors from youth facilities staying under the same roof;
    • and/or in the company of a maximum of two other persons, who are always the same two persons, at a distance of 1.5 metres between each person;

    These activities are permitted for the time necessary to do them. Once these activities are completed, it is compulsory to return home. To avoid gatherings, it is not allowed to sit in parks. Tolerance must be shown towards pregnant women and the elderly. This measure does not have to be strictly applied either to people with reduced mobility or mental disabilities. For the same reasons, picnics and sunbathing are not allowed in parks either. The use of a motorised vehicle to carry out a physical activity or walk is only allowed to travel to the destination (e.g. a forest at a reasonable distance) or the necessary sports infrastructure of the sport or walk in question. Moreover, it is reiterated that tourist activities or excursions are not allowed.

    1. Visit to one other household within the restrictions allowed under the “social contacts” section of this chapter;
    2. Visits to nature and/or cultural sightseeing;
    3. Journey to a regular training course outdoors in an organised capacity;
    4. Travel to and from a second home;
    5. Moving to and from an outdoor playground;
    6. All other movements explicitly referred to in these FAQs.

    More information: https://mobilit.belgium.be/en/aviation/covid_19_coronavirus

  • What if you do not live under the same roof as your partner or children in the context of co-parenting?
    Visiting your partner or children in the context of co-parenting is an authorised journey.
  • I'm in my dorm right now. Can I go back to my parents?
    It is recommended that students find a permanent place to stay during the lockdown. Foreign students who have to resume their classes can go to their student accommodation.
  • What about tourism?
    Tourism is prohibited throughout Belgian territory.
  • Can I travel to my holiday home, for example in the Ardennes or at the coast?

    Yes this is allowed in Belgium for owners and for tenants who have a minimum rental contract of one year. A second home is considered to be:

    • A house or apartment;
    • An immobile residence with a fixed pitch (e.g. a (mobile) caravan, bungalow).

    It is, therefore, not permitted to move around with a mobile home, such as a caravan, but it may be used if it is already installed on a fixed pitch. On camp sites where there are second homes, the following measures apply:

    • Bars, common areas of restaurants and recreational areas are closed. Terrace furniture must be brought inside and may not be used.
    • Special attention must be paid to the hygiene of sanitary facilities (regular cleaning of showers, toilets and the provision of hand hygiene products, etc.).
  • Who can visit a second home?
    The owner(s) or long-term tenant(s) (minimum 1 year) and the persons living under the same roof. They may receive up to 4 people from their social bubble. These are the same people you are allowed to receive at home, under the same conditions as described in the “Social contacts” section under chapter “General Measurres”.
  • Can a beach cabin be used?
    The use of beach cabins is allowed according to the terms defined by the Mayor. Short-term rental must be avoided for sanitary reasons. Please bear in mind that the social distancing rules must be respected both when using the beach cabins and on the beach.
  • Can I take driving classes and obtain my driving licence?

    Theoretical and practical driving lessons and exams are resumed. Exercising on public roads is considered to be an authorised journey. For further information, please contact:

  • In Flanders, Wallonia and Brussels, vehicle inspection centres were closed. Am I still validly insured if my inspection certificate expires after 13 March 2020?

    The regions have made a political undertaking to renew any ‘inspection certificate’ that expires after 13 March 2020. As such, motor vehicles whose inspection certificate expired after 13 March 2020 have a valid certificate. The insurer cannot invoke this reason in the context of recourse against the policyholder.

    In Flanders, the certificates are renewed for a period of four months after the end of the crisis measures (https://www.vlaanderen.be/gezondheid-en-welzijn/gezondheid/coronavirus-covid-19/maatregelen-tegen-verspreiding-corona-rijopleiding-rijexamens-en-autokeuring). In the Brussels region, the period of validity of inspection certificates has been extended. For more information, you can visit the following website: https://mobilite-mobiliteit.brussels/nl/covid-19-parkeren-rijscholen-technische-keuring-bouwplaatsen-wat-verandert-er In Wallonia, the relevant information about car inspections can be found at: http://mobilite.wallonie.be/home/je-suis/un-citoyen/en-voiture/services-et-solutions/controle-technique.html

  • Is it still possible to use shared cars and shared scooters?
    Yes, these are considered as means of transport and are therefore not prohibited.
  • Can I sit in a van with my colleague?

    Yes, only if you respect the social distance (1.5 meters). A transparent screen provides adequate protection and installing one can be permitted in means of transport, provided that certain road safety requirements are met.

    For the Flemish Region: https://www.vlaanderen.be/gezondheid-en-welzijn/gezondheid/gezondheid-en-preventie-tijdens-de-coronacrisis/coronamaatregelen-voor-technische-keuring/tijdelijke-demonteerbare-afscherming-in-voertuigen

  • Are specific measures applicable to the transport of disabled persons or persons with reduced mobility?
    The most important thing is that no new social mixing occurs. Transport can therefore continue, but it must be ensured as much as possible that the same combination of drivers and persons with reduced mobility/disabled persons is maintained, subject to hygiene and social distancing measures. Voluntary transport of disabled persons and people in need can continue, and insofar as possible, a minimum distance of 1.5 metres must be maintained between each person. The number of persons that can be transported therefore varies according to the type of vehicle.
  • Are there any specific measures for public transport?
    Public transport remains operational. It is recommended to avoid the use of public transport if an alternative is available. Public transport users who are 12 years of age or older are obliged to cover their mouths and noses by wearing a face mask or any other fabric alternative. This applies from the moment they enter the airport, station, at stops or on the platform, train or other means of transport organised by a public authority. Public transport drivers are not required to cover their nose and mouth, insofar as the driver is well-isolated in a cabin on the one hand, and a poster and/or sticker indicates to users the reason why the driver is not wearing a mask on the other. This exception also applies, under the same conditions, to drivers of organised collective transport (e.g. school bus). Please consult the relevant websites for the available services of transport companies.
  • Are private buses and coaches allowed to organise passenger transport?
    Yes, buses and coaches may arrange organised transport in the context of authorised journeys and subject to the application of the necessary hygiene and preventive measures by passengers and transport companies. The occupancy rate of buses and coaches must not exceed 50% and passengers must be evenly distributed throughout the vehicle. Passengers over the age of 12 must cover their mouth and nose by wearing a face mask or any other fabric alternative.
  • What about taxis (and other on-demand transport services)?
    Taxis are allowed to transport customers. A minimum distance of 1.5 metres must be maintained between each person. The number of persons that can be transported therefore varies according to the type of vehicle. A family can travel in the same car, social distancing does not apply here. It is recommended to regularly ventilate and clean the vehicle. Wearing a mouth and nose covering is strongly advised.
  • What measures have been taken with regard to carpooling? How many people are allowed to travel in a private car?
    As is the case for taxis a minimum distance of 1.5 metres between each person must be respected during transport. The number of persons that can be transported therefore varies according to the type of vehicle. This measure does not apply to a family. It is recommended to ventilate and clean the car regularly. In general, travel should be avoided as much as possible. Wearing a mouth and nose covering is strongly advised.
  • Are aviation companies allowed to fly?
    In the context of the resumption of economic activities, all commercial flights are permitted regardless of the type of aircraft as defined on the website https://mobilit.belgium.be/en/aviation/covid_19_coronavirus, whether VFR or IFR (this concerns business to business and business to customer commercial activities).
  • Which small-scale aviation activities are allowed?
    Local VFR flights (with the same take-off and landing site and no intermediate landing) which are operated as solo flights or with a person living under the same roof on board, for each type of aircraft as for flights with model aircraft and UAVs.
  • Can pilot training be resumed?
    All activities related to training, exams and verification procedures for certificates of competence for any type of aircraft (practical and theoretical lessons) are allowed. The same strict rules as for driving schools must be respected.
  • Are specific measures taken for boats and cruise ships?
    Cruise ships and boats are not allowed to let passengers disembark, but can receive supplies. New cruises organised by boats or ships sailing under the Belgian flag are prohibited. For more information on shipping, please contact the FPS Mobility: https://mobilit.belgium.be/en/shipping/covid_19_coronavirus
  • What are the general principles for traveling abroad?

    Article 7 of the Ministerial Order of 23 March 2020 laying down urgent measures to limit the spread of the coronavirus COVID-19 stipulates that non-essential travel to and from Belgium is prohibited. This measure will expire on 8 June 2020, but can be extended. For an overview of the Ministerial Order and the various changes: https://crisiscentrum.be/nl/news/crisisbeheer/coronavirus-de-antwoorden-op-al-je-vragen

    • Nonetheless, any person with Belgian nationality, with or without their main residence in Belgium, long-term residents in Belgium and persons with legal residence in Belgium, may always return to Belgium.

    • Border crossings in both directions will, in any event, remain possible on presentation of legitimate proof and in the context of goods transport and journeys of a professional nature (including seasonal workers; educational journeys, except for school trips). There are other possibilities for journeys, which are specified in the “What other essential journeys to Belgium are still permitted?” and “May people travel abroad from Belgium?” questions. It is permitted to travel to a neighbouring country to visit a family member who lives there. For the same reason, residents of a neighbouring country are allowed to travel to Belgium. The conditions for such travel are described in the question “May I visit my family living on the other side of the border?”. It is also permitted to shop in a neighbouring country, subject to the measures applicable in that country. As is the case for all border crossings, it is recommended to consult the travel advice of Foreign Affairs and the website of the embassy of the destination country. These measures are constantly evolving and cannot therefore be described here.

    • Furthermore, travel restrictions and border controls will be lifted gradually when the favourable epidemiological situations are sufficiently similar.

    • Travelling abroad for tourist purposes is still prohibited.

    • As regards the external borders of the EU, the Commission has made recommendations to Member States to selectively restrict the access of persons to the EU. In Belgium, the temporary restrictions on non-essential journeys outside the EU are in force until 15 June 2020. These restrictions may be extended.

    • A person who is a national or resident of a third country can always leave Belgian territory to return to the country of which he/she is a national or resident. Nevertheless, certain countries do not allow their residents to return to their country. It is therefore advisable to contact the embassy of the destination.

    If you are planning to make an essential journey abroad, it is highly recommended to consult the travel advice from Foreign Affairs, which is being continually updated: https://diplomatie.belgium.be/nl/Diensten/Op_reis_in_het_buitenland/reisadviezen

  • Can I still travel to Belgium from abroad?

    The general principle is that any person with Belgian nationality, with or without their main residence in Belgium, long-term residents in Belgium and persons with legal residence in Belgium, may return to Belgium subject to two conditions. The two conditions are that:

    • The person must remain in self-isolation at home for 14 days; and
    • The person is prohibited from working outdoors for 14 days (even if they are employed in an essential sector), although teleworking is still permitted.

    These two conditions apply to returning persons and cover all possible modes of transport used (air, land and sea) for their return. In the case of return via a domestic or foreign airport, these two conditions also apply to the person who is going to pick up the returning person(s), but not to the rest of the family who live under the same roof. The person picking up the returning person should preferably be a family member, but if the family members are employed in an essential sector, it is not recommended that they go to pick up the returning person. These two conditions do not apply to frontier workers, seasonal workers, drivers employed by professional transport companies and persons who make an essential journey, with the exception of persons who have gone to pick up returning persons from a foreign airport (see previous paragraph).

    As a rule, the returning person, regardless of whether they arrive on Belgian territory or another country, uses public transport (taxi or rental car) to get to their destination; If public transport/taxi is not an option, the returning person can be picked up by another person (preferably a member of the same family, but not employed in an essential sector); Preferably, no more than two people should travel in the vehicle. An exception to this is if several persons from the same family have to be picked up. During the travel, social distancing measures must be respected.

    On Belgian territory, public transport users who are 12 years of age or older are obliged to cover their mouths and noses by wearing a face mask or any other fabric alternative. This applies from the moment they enter the airport, station, at stops or on the platform, train or other means of transport organised by a public authority.

    Remark: The person going to pick up another person must be in possession of proof of identity and/or passport. If the pick-up takes place abroad, legitimate proof to cross the border justifying the essential journey.

  • What about Belgian nationals returning to a Belgian seaport or inland port with their recreational craft?
    They may navigate Belgian waters with their craft only in order to reach the port of destination of their choice by the shortest route. They must report to the harbour master’s office of their port of destination (for inland ports: the port operator) via the usual radio frequencies for the geographical area of their destination. They must also report whether they are sick or showing symptoms or whether there are sick persons or persons with symptoms of any kind on board. https://mobilit.belgium.be/nl/scheepvaart/covid_19_coronavirus
  • What rules apply if, as a foreign national with no main residence in Belgium, I merely want to cross Belgian territory on my way to my destination?
    The general principle is that foreign nationals must be able to enter and leave Belgian territory easily in order to travel on to their destination. Individuals in transit through Belgian territory must observe the social distancing measures in the chosen means of transport. If the transport is by road, buses and vehicles do not stop on Belgian territory as a rule. If the journey is by train, a minimum number of connections and the shortest travel route must be ensured. Persons in transit through Belgian territory must be in possession of an identity document and/or passport and legitimate proof.
  • Which rules do I have to comply with if I arrive in Belgium by air, train, road or sea, in further transit abroad?
    The general principle is that foreign nationals in transit on Belgian territory must be able to leave Belgian territory as quickly as possible. As a rule, persons in transit through Belgian territory use public transport (including taxis) to travel to their destination. Renting a car is also a possibility. If public transport/taxi/rental car is not an option, persons in transit through Belgian territory can be picked up by another person or authority (possibly from abroad) to leave Belgian territory immediately after pick-up. During transport through Belgian territory, at most the social distancing measures must be observed. If the transport is dropped off by the employer, the social distancing measures must be observed. As a rule, road journeys cannot stop on Belgian territory. If the journey is by train, a minimum number of connections and the shortest travel route must be ensured. Persons in transit through Belgian territory must be in possession of an identity document and/or passport. The person picking up in transit through Belgian territory must be in possession of an identity document and/or passport and legitimate proof confirming the necessity of the journey.
  • Is frontier work still allowed?
    The general principle is that when performing their professional activities, both in essential and non-essential sectors, frontier workers must be able to enter and leave Belgian territory smoothly to reach their destination. Frontier workers can use their own chosen means of transport. They are allowed to go shopping during these journeys. During transport through Belgian territory, at most the social distancing measures must be observed. Frontier workers must be in possession of an identity document and/or passport and a certificate from the employer is strongly recommended; For the work-related journeys of employees in vital professions/crucial sectors, a paper vignette can be used bilaterally between Belgium and the Netherlands.
  • Are border crossings for medical reasons allowed?
    According to the general principle, you should consult a doctor in your own country. If the doctor in possession of your medical file is in a neighbouring country, this doctor must provide you with a signed document (by post or digitally) showing that it is necessary for you to go to their practice. At the border, you will have to present your identity card and this document.
    Urgent medical assistance will remain guaranteed and border crossings by emergency services are permitted for this, based on the existing agreements.
  • Can seasonal workers come and work in the agricultural and horticultural sector in Belgium?
    Seasonal work in the agricultural and horticultural sector is essential in order to guarantee the food chain and food supply. This seasonal work is also performed by foreign workers. In this context, it is therefore important that the journeys of seasonal workers in and to our country are seen as essential journeys. Seasonal workers from other countries may be admitted and must follow the same measures as Belgian nationals. In order to enter the territory, they must present a certificate from their employer. Upon arrival, they do not have to be quarantined for 14 days.
  • What other essential journeys to Belgium are still permitted?
    The general principle is that assistance and care for the elderly, minors, vulnerable persons and persons with disabilities; co-parenting; visit to a partner who does not live under the same roof; care for animals; executing deeds; attending funerals/cremations only in the presence of maximum 30 people; and attending civil/religious weddings is allowed. People can choose their own means of transport. These persons must be in possession of an identity document and/or passport and legitimate proof to justify the essential journey.
  • Can learners, students and interns from neighbouring countries, who go to school in Belgium in the context of their education, come to Belgium?
    In the context of resuming school activities, learners, students and interns from neighbouring countries can come to Belgium.
  • What about people stuck in a foreign country?
    You will find the necessary information on the website of the FPS Foreign Affairs: https://diplomatie.belgium.be/nl.
  • Is it still allowed to travel abroad from Belgium?

    The general principle is that any non-essential travel abroad is prohibited up to and including 8 June 2020. In other countries, the respective national regulations and any additional measures must be respected. It is strongly advised to consult these regulations on the respective websites of the relevant foreign authorities. In accordance with the regulations in force in the country of destination, the necessary documentation must be prepared before departure. You must be in possession of an identity document and/or passport and legitimate proof to make the essential journey. The following journeys are currently being resumed as essential reasons to travel abroad:

    1.    Journeys abroad in the context of professional activities, including commuting;
      
    2.    Journeys to continue medical care;
      
    3.    Journeys to provide assistance or care to an elderly person, minor, disabled or vulnerable person;
      
    4.    Journeys to take care of animals;
      
    5.    Journeys in the context of co-parenting;
      
    6.    Journeys to pick up any person with Belgian nationality, with or without their main residence in Belgium, long-term residents in Belgium and persons with legal residence in Belgium, from abroad and bring them back to Belgium;
      
    7.    Journeys to take family members abroad so they can carry out their activities for essential reasons;
      
    8.    Journeys of Belgian nationals to their main residence abroad. 
      
    9.    Journeys to a partner who does not live under the same roof;
      
    10.    Journeys in the context of the execution of a deed (if necessary and cannot be done digitally);
      
    11.    Journeys in the context of funerals / cremations; 
      
    12.    Journeys in the context of civil / religious marriages;
      
    13.    Journeys of learners, students and interns, who go to school in a neighbouring country in the context of their education.
      
    14.    Journeys to have urgent repairs carried out in the context of vehicle safety. 
      

    Journeys to a second residence abroad are excluded in this regard.

  • When can I visit my family who live on the other side of the border?

    Yes, It is permitted to travel to a neighbouring country to visit a family member who lives there, subject to compliance with the applicable measures in that country. As is the case for all border crossings, it is recommended to consult the travel advice of Foreign Affairs and the website of the embassy of the destination country. These measures are constantly evolving and cannot therefore be described here.

    It is also allowed for residents of a neighbouring country to travel to Belgium for the same reason. These journeys are possible provided that the principle of social bubbles is respected:

    • A household (i.e. persons living under the same roof and regardless of the number) may receive visits from no more than four people.
    • These must always be the same four people, and may or may not be part of the same household. These people must form a social bubble.
    • The four people are chosen as a household and not as individuals. For example, if the whole household chooses to visit their four grandparents, they cannot invite their friends.
    • When a person from one household is invited to another person’s home, his/her entire household commits itself, even if this person is the only one visiting. For example, it is therefore not possible to meet with one’s parents one day and four other people the next.
    • The necessary physical distance (1.5 metres) must always be respected between people from different households. The visit should preferably take place outside (for example on a terrace or in the garden).
    • The visit cannot take place if any of these people are ill.

    Persons who are visiting, or have already visited, a family member in Belgium or a neighbouring country are not subject to quarantine in Belgium. It is not yet allowed to visit a family member in countries other than our neighbouring countries. It is not allowed either that residents in countries other than our neighbouring countries come to visit relatives in Belgium.

  • Can I go shopping on the other side of the border?
    Yes, it is permitted to travel to a neighbouring country for this purpose, subject to compliance with the applicable measures in that country. As is the case for all border crossings, it is recommended to consult the travel advice of Foreign Affairs and the website of the embassy of the destination country. These measures are constantly evolving and cannot therefore be described here. Residents of our neighbouring countries are also allowed to buy things in Belgium. People making these journeys, or who have already done so, are not subject to quarantine in Belgium.
  • What about ferries to neighbouring countries?
    Unlike boats and cruise ships, ferry travel is not regarded as a recreational activity, but as a means of transport. Consequently, ferry crossings are not prohibited in the context of essential travel, subject to social distancing measures.
  • Are specific measures taken for Belgian airports?

    Passengers must observe the social distancing measures and the airport operator must facilitate these. Anyone aged 12 and over is obliged to cover their mouth and nose with a mask or any other fabric alternative, as soon as they enter the airport.

    More information: https://mobilit.belgium.be/en/aviation/covid_19_coronavirus

  • Will the restaurants and tax-free shops at airports remain open?
    Yes, the restaurants and shops beyond security control remain open. This is with a view to spreading passengers as widely as possible in the airport terminal and subject to social distancing measures.
  • Can I cross the border with my children to take them to the day care centre?
    If there is no other possibility, it is allowed to cross the border to take the child to the crèche. This possibility does not apply to childcare provided by family members and friends. It is allowed to cross the border on presentation of the child’s registration in the crèche.
  • Can an employee use a digital version of the vignette/employer certificate to cross the border?
    If the employer cannot personally supply the vignette/employer’s certificate to the employee, it must be sent by post. If the employee is summoned for urgent reasons, the vignette/employer’s certificate can be sent digitally by the employer accompanied by a certificate signed by the employer with their telephone number and the name of the person summoned.
  • Can a student cross the border to empty or lease his/her student room?
    A student can cross the border for this reason under the following conditions: one journey (back and forth), taking the shortest route, alone or with one person living under the same roof and on presentation of the student card (and/or certificate from the educational institution) and the tenancy agreement/property deed/proof of agreement with the owner. The rules applicable in the destination country must be respected at all times. Staying overnight at the student room is strongly discouraged. If an overnight stay is nonetheless necessary, the persons who have made the journey must place themselves in home isolation for 14 days after their return.
  • What about co-parenting for children between parents living on both sides of the border?
    Co- parenthood of parents living in the border region (one in Belgium, the other in The Netherlands for example) can continue.
  • I booked a flight/a trip to a country concerned by the coronavirus. What will happen if I decide to cancel it?
    The FPS Economy has published advice for travellers in your situation. You will find it on their website (https://economie.fgov.be/fr/themes/entreprises/coronavirus/informations-pour-les/pas-encore-parti/coronavirus-annulation-par) (Information only available in French or Dutch).
  • I am abroad and my return flight has been cancelled as a consequence of the coronavirus. What can I do?
    The FPS Economy has published advice for travellers in your situation. You will find it on their website (https://economie.fgov.be/fr/themes/entreprises/coronavirus/informations-pour-les/pas-encore-parti/coronavirus-annulation-par) (Information only available in French or Dutch).
  • I booked a flight/a trip that has been cancelled because of the coronavirus. What are my rights?
    The FPS Economy has published advice for travellers in your situation. You will find it on their website (https://economie.fgov.be/fr/themes/entreprises/coronavirus/informations-pour-les/pas-encore-parti/coronavirus-annulation-par) (Information only available in French or Dutch).
  • I am abroad and I am not allowed to leave the country because of the coronavirus. What are my rights?
    The FPS Economy has published advice for travellers in your situation. You will find it on their website (https://economie.fgov.be/fr/themes/entreprises/coronavirus/informations-pour-les/pas-encore-parti/coronavirus-annulation-par) (Information only available in French or Dutch).

Didn’t find an answer to your question?

Consult the information available on the websites of the competent authorities or call 0800 14 689.

What will happen after June 8?

The information on this page applies until 7 June. On 3 June, the National Security Council decided on the measures as from 8 June.